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Crystal/Caramel Malts

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Poll: Crystal/Caramel Malt Treatment (23 member(s) have cast votes)

How do you treat crystal malts in your grain bill?

  1. Mill and mash as a normal part of the grain bill. (23 votes [100.00%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 100.00%

  2. Mill and cold steep, add liquor to kettle. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  3. Mill and steep at 155°F, add liquor to kettle. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  4. Other Method not listed, please explain. (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  5. No Pants, I don't need no stinkin' crystal malts! (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

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#1 miccullen

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 09:01 AM

This is a question for all grain and partial mashers (I assume extract brewers use one of the steep methods by default)

 

How do you treat crystal/caramel type malts, concerning mashing.

 

Do you;

 

1) Mill and mash with the rest of the grain?

2) Mill and cold steep overnight, add liquor to kettle.

3) Mill and steep at 155°F, add liquor to kettle.

4) Other, please explain.

 

 

Personally I just mill and mash as normal, but, I have read that some people steep separately.

 

I there any valid reason to go through the trouble of a separate steep?

 

 


Edited by miccullen, 25 June 2014 - 09:01 AM.

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#2 neddles

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 09:06 AM

Usually mill and mash with everything else. I have added them late to the mash before. But really I usually use them in low enough percentages that I'm not sure there is an advantage to treating them separately.


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#3 ER Pemberton

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 09:20 AM

Yep, mill and mash.  I have been going easier on all forms of crystal malt, generally.  I know some people who do not like it at all and I don't fit into that category.  But I also know some people who have no trouble adding 2 pounds of crystal to a 5 gallon batch which I don't do.  4 ounces of CaraMunich here, 8 ounces of C60 there, etc.  But I do not treat it any differently than other grains that go into the mash.


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#4 SchwanzBrewer

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 09:21 AM

No reason not to just throw them in. Contrary to some internet folklore, they do add to the overall fermentable sugars, though not as much as base malt.

 

Roasted malts, that is another matter. I'm considering trying the method of a late mash addition with roasted malts next time I make a stout.


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#5 miccullen

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 09:35 AM

No reason not to just throw them in. Contrary to some internet folklore, they do add to the overall fermentable sugars, though not as much as base malt.

 

Roasted malts, that is another matter. I'm considering trying the method of a late mash addition with roasted malts next time I make a stout.

I have considered doing the same Rich, if nothing else to get the full color extraction.


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#6 brewman

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 10:26 AM

In with everything else.

 

Dan


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#7 SchwanzBrewer

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 10:36 AM

I have considered doing the same Rich, if nothing else to get the full color extraction.

 

without the acridity. That's what I'm trying to avoid. The roasted barley I'll cold steep on my next batch. Roasted malts will go in the last 15 minutes.


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#8 ER Pemberton

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 10:39 AM

I have heard of adding darker malts near the end of the mash to get color without astringency. But Midnight Wheat, dehusked Carafa and debittered black malt seem to work pretty nicely when just adding them to the mash with everything else. I suppose you could add 4-6 ounces of Carafa to a 5-gallon batch and get some roastiness but in Jamil's Vienna I use 1.5 to 2 ounces of Carafa III and in my Bordertown dark lager I use 2 ounces of Midnight Wheat and both are very smooth.
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#9 Poptop

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 10:40 AM

In with the mash


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#10 SchwanzBrewer

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 10:55 AM

I have heard of adding darker malts near the end of the mash to get color without astringency. But Midnight Wheat, dehusked Carafa and debittered black malt seem to work pretty nicely when just adding them to the mash with everything else. I suppose you could add 4-6 ounces of Carafa to a 5-gallon batch and get some roastiness but in Jamil's Vienna I use 1.5 to 2 ounces of Carafa III and in my Bordertown dark lager I use 2 ounces of Midnight Wheat and both are very smooth.

 

Depends on the amount and what malt/grain it is. I use dehusked carafa II in my alt. My stout is a bit too acrid for my tastes and it uses quite a bit of roasted barley + chocolate malt. 


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#11 miccullen

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 11:05 AM

Depends on the amount and what malt/grain it is. I use dehusked carafa II in my alt. My stout is a bit too acrid for my tastes and it uses quite a bit of roasted barley + chocolate malt. 

what kind of RB?


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#12 SchwanzBrewer

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 12:06 PM

what kind of RB?

 

Brand? Probably briess last time. I don't think my LHBS has another type. Note that it's roasted barley NOT roasted malt.


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#13 miccullen

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 12:37 PM

Brand? Probably briess last time. I don't think my LHBS has another type. Note that it's roasted barley NOT roasted malt.

I swore off Briess RB, I use the Brit stuff, I think it's Simpson, black as all hell like 575L don't need as much to reach the same color and less astringency


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#14 BlKtRe

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 01:38 PM

I have heard of adding darker malts near the end of the mash to get color without astringency. But Midnight Wheat, dehusked Carafa and debittered black malt seem to work pretty nicely when just adding them to the mash with everything else. I suppose you could add 4-6 ounces of Carafa to a 5-gallon batch and get some roastiness but in Jamil's Vienna I use 1.5 to 2 ounces of Carafa III and in my Bordertown dark lager I use 2 ounces of Midnight Wheat and both are very smooth.

 

Mill and mash.

 

I used to cold mash or cap using black patent but with the Carafa's and MW I just mash with them from the beginning. I will say tho that I get a full bodied mouth feel and a certain smooth roast flavor from MW that I don't get with any other type of dark malts. 


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#15 Mando

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 01:43 PM

I understand why people might want to cold steep or cap RB or something similar.  but crystal?  i've never gotten anything harsh from crystal.  also - pretty much everyone needs to acidify their mash and crystal is going to help you out there.


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#16 SchwanzBrewer

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 01:44 PM

Mill and mash.

 

I used to cold mash or cap using black patent but with the Carafa's and MW I just mash with them from the beginning. I will say tho that I get a full bodied mouth feel and a certain smooth roast flavor from MW that I don't get with any other type of dark malts. 

 

Would the midnight wheat be a good primary roasted malt for a porter?


Edited by SchwanzBrewer, 25 June 2014 - 01:45 PM.

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#17 BlKtRe

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:00 PM

Would the midnight wheat be a good primary roasted malt for a porter?

 

It could be for color adjustment. I did a Black Wheat using

 

65% Pale

30% Wheat

5%   Midnight Wheat

 

and this smooth full bodied, flavor thing was there. So I would use less than that or it could come through in a Porter. 


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#18 miccullen

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:24 PM

I understand why people might want to cold steep or cap RB or something similar.  but crystal?  i've never gotten anything harsh from crystal.  also - pretty much everyone needs to acidify their mash and crystal is going to help you out there.

yeah, I agree, but (not surprisingly) I have seen some disagreement on the internet about this, some claim it helps to"smooth out" the flavor of the crystal


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#19 MtnBrewer

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:33 PM

Would the midnight wheat be a good primary roasted malt for a porter?

I think you need some roasted coffee & chocolate flavors for a porter. You don't get much of that from MW.

#20 SchwanzBrewer

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 02:37 PM

I think you need some roasted coffee & chocolate flavors for a porter. You don't get much of that from MW.

 

Ok, that's what I'm looking for. Will note it.


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