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Naturally carbing kegs = yeasty flavor

yeast finings

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#1 *_Guest_Matt C_*

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 02:24 PM

Ok. So I started carbing in the kegs naturally with priming sugar. I have found that I need to add more sugar than what I initially thought. I am re-yeasting with champagne yeast a). because its cheap B ).. because its easy to measure. :P So the last keg I primed I did exactly that, re-yeasted and added a little over 1/2 cup of corn sugar. I waited 3 weeks and I still donot have the level of carbonation that I is necessary.Thats not a problem, I am just gonna finish it in the fridge with the gas. However, my problem is when you re-yeast you tend to get a "yeasty" flavor as well, unless you cold condition or use finings. I saw the Brewing TV guys add finings and priming sugar to their firkin at the same time!? You would think that defeats the purpose! Wouldn't the finings pull down the yeast that is supposed to be carbing up the keg? In the video it worked for those guys, but can anyone give me some inisght on this practice....and experience? Thanks and cheers...P.S. I have never had very good luck with gelatin nor polyclar.
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#2 Corbin

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 02:33 PM

When you naturally carb a keg with priming sugar you leave it at room temp don't you? Basically like a big bottle. I'm looking at a 2.5g keg and will be naturally carbing that one. Just curious if the Co2 levels change once you put it in the fridge.
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#3 *_Guest_Matt C_*

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 02:52 PM

When you naturally carb a keg with priming sugar you leave it at room temp don't you? Basically like a big bottle. I'm looking at a 2.5g keg and will be naturally carbing that one. Just curious if the Co2 levels change once you put it in the fridge.

Yep left it at (68-70F).....room temp. I don't think the carbonation would change any more than your bottles would. At that point the beer has absorbed any given c02 that was given off...at least in theory. Force carbing takes less time because the beer is cold,therefore the C02 is absorbed more readily.

Why bother re-yeasting? There should be plenty of yeast microbes in suspension.

Have had trouble in the past with lagers and high gravity beers. I have a few bottles of barleywine that never carbed up because I never re-yeasted.
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#4 SchwanzBrewer

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 02:53 PM

In my experiments with it I needed to up the priming sugar a little. Probably another 1/2 oz would do. It was carbonated, but not quite enough. I can't remember what weight I used initially. Cheers,Rich
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#5 *_Guest_Matt C_*

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 03:08 PM

Yep. That's what I was going to try. I was thinking maybe another oz actually. I know that my beersmith measurement was undercarbed.
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#6 *_Guest_Matt C_*

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 05:10 PM

Bump. Can anyone answer this dilemma? I would really like to start naturally carbing kegs the "real ale" way but if I'm gonna have issues with yeasty flavors and off flavors due to yeast still in suspension, I guess I'll go back to force carbing. I have noticed a carbonic acid bite in the last beer I had. Seemed very noticeable and I think it took away from the final product. If I carbed naturally, I would not have this problem.
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#7 beach

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 05:29 PM

I force carb but it seems to me that if you handle a naturally carbed keg the same way you handle a bottle conditioned beer you shouldn't have a yeast flavor in the beer. As long as you're not in a hurry and handle carefully the yeast should end up at the bottom. A pint or 2 should get you a fairly clear pour. .02Beach
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#8 SchwanzBrewer

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 05:36 PM

How do you ferment? Do you secondary or go straight from primary to keg?I take my primary out of the swamp cooler after 2 weeks and put it in the fridge to clear up for a week. Then I rack it to a keg and carbonate for a week if I am force carbonating.If I naturally carbonate I add just the priming sugar solution. Like I said above, I need to use another 1/2 oz or so. There should be enough yeast left over to not reyeast the beer.If your beer is coming out "yeasty" then I suspect you have a lot of yeast in suspension (duh, right). Try using some gelatin to clear it, or don't reyeast your regular gravity beers. If you absolutely have to reyeast, I would carbonate naturally, then you might try hitting it up with gelatin and carefully transferring to a new keg.Cheers,Rich
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#9 *_Guest_Matt C_*

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 05:58 PM

I usually don't secondary even for lagers most of the time. I dry hop in the keg almost always. I have used gelatin and polyclar with little success in the past. In retrospect I am not sure I am using them correctly. What is the proper procedure for maximum effectiveness??
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#10 SchwanzBrewer

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Posted 16 December 2011 - 08:11 AM

I usually don't secondary even for lagers most of the time. I dry hop in the keg almost always. I have used gelatin and polyclar with little success in the past. In retrospect I am not sure I am using them correctly. What is the proper procedure for maximum effectiveness??

I'll send a PM to Ken, he is the local beer clearing expert and ask him to take on this question.Go here to his website. He has a lot of good info about 2/3 down the page on how to produce clear beer.Cheers,Rich
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#11 Mando

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Posted 16 December 2011 - 08:37 AM

I usually don't secondary even for lagers most of the time. I dry hop in the keg almost always. I have used gelatin and polyclar with little success in the past. In retrospect I am not sure I am using them correctly. What is the proper procedure for maximum effectiveness??

I've found that if you have the time most of my beers will clear up without the use of gel - the gel just seems to make it happen faster. in cold temps yeast should floc out pretty well if that's really the issue.
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