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Motorizing a JSP Malt Mill


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#1 MtnBrewer

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 12:03 PM

Motorizing your JSP Malt MillUsing the Beefy BodineI spent a lot of prep-time looking at a dozen different web-sites and forum posts before starting this project, so thanks to all of those folks that shared their experiences prior. I’m not very handy so I thought I’d create a more complete “How To” in terms of motorizing your mill using the Beefy Bodine motor so that others like myself can easy do the same project without fear.Here’s a parts list (and pic) of the parts I picked up to start the project:
    [*]Beefy Bodine Motor* - no. 34580 from www.sciplus.com ($29.99 + $6.95 shipping)[*]AC Motor-Run Capacitor 370 Vac, 45 Microfarad Rating – Part # 7602K37 from www.mcmaster.com , $23.32[*]Spider Coupling Hubs, one 3/8" and one 5/8"- Part # 6408K11 from www.mcmaster.com , $2.10 each[*]Buna-N Spider for 1-5/64" Outside Dia Coupling Hub- Part # 6408K84 from www.mcmaster.com , $1.36[*]Extension cord with ground wire[*]Household switch and switch cover plate[*]3/4" plywood[*]Wood for legs[*]Something to attach the motor to the plywood. If you can find a bracket that fits, that will work., otherwise you can use some a metal or plastic tie.[*]Wire connectors[/list]*At the time of writing this, the Beefy Bodine is out of stock. Another alternative I’ve seen is Part # 5-1086 from www.surpluscenter.com. This is a bit faster than the Beefy Bodine, but others have reported good results using it.Posted ImageTo start, you need to remove the wheel from the motor (if yours has one). To do this, remove the three screws holding the wheel on it, place them in the other holes and screw them in. This will push the wheel from the motor:Posted ImagePosted ImageNext, you need a table or something to mount your motor and mill to. Many of the folks that have done this project use a basic 2x4 type table with plywood as the tabletop. Others have designed a table-top design that sits on buckets (one which usually catches the grain). Whatever works for you is fine. The key is that there is enough space on top for your motor and your mill, and there is enough room underneath to fit your grain bucket.The table I made was relatively simple, but still more than what is absolutely necessary. Before attaching anything, I measured out the a skirt to put around the outside so the table was more stable (you can put these between the legs if you want to).Posted ImageAfter everything’s measured out, it’s time to start putting it together:Posted ImageAfter I got the legs all attached, I added braces to the skirt and a small piece of wood to each side to attach the table-top:Posted ImagePosted ImageAfter attaching the top, the table itself is complete:Posted ImageAt a minimum, you’ll want to cut an opening for the maltmill. I added a second opening to put in the switch. One thing to keep in mind when cutting the opening is, if you attach a box to the tabletop as I do (shown below), you will need to cut the opening longer by about an inch on each side than the mill’s opening. This is so you can attach/remove the mill (pictured near the end of the project).Posted Image

#2 MtnBrewer

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 12:09 PM

This next part was one of the most challenging. There is a height difference between the motor and the mill that has to be adjusted so that the coupler can be attached. The easy answer is to increase the height of the mill by added a small box to the table. However, it’s a little challenging to actually attach it to everything.Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImageI glued some corners to the box and drilled holes in them to attach it to the top of the table. After attaching, I had to use a nail-gun to attach the top of the box.Posted ImageNext, it’s time to get the wiring for this thing going. Here’s the table as we get started:Posted ImageFirst thing I did was clip the end off the motor wiring:Posted ImageNext, I attached the coupling so I could attach the motor to the table and drill a hole for the wiring:Posted ImagePosted ImageNext, cut the end of the extension cord off and then cut another two foot section of the extension cord and remove the wire from the outside coating. You’ll also want to remove a decent amount of the three wires on the main cord:Posted ImagePosted Image

#3 MtnBrewer

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Posted 05 April 2009 - 12:14 PM

Next, I attached some endings onto the wires that will be attached to the capacitor. This isn’t absolutely necessary, but the ends are cheap and it is easier than soddering.Posted ImagePosted ImageThe wiring was a bit confusing at first, but thanks to another brewers wiring diagram (thanks Walt!), I was able to put it together. Here’s the chart:Posted ImageWalt’s own malt mill project can be found at www.lamabrewery.comI chose not to hook up the forward/reverse switch, but there’s no reason you can’t add that via Walt’s chart. If you go a simple switch like me, you’ll have three wires from the power cord, and two wires from the extra piece you cut off (you can pitch the green wire you have cut).Starting with the power cord ends, the black wire goes on the top right post of the switch, the white and green wires will go to the white and green wires from the motor itself.The extra two wires you cut need to connect to the red and blue wires from the motor on one side and the capacitor on the other.Posted ImagePosted ImageBelow is a shot of the underneath of my table. You can see a little better how the wires connect and get a good shot of how the base of the table connects to the table-top.Posted ImageAnother shot from underneath shows how you actually attach the mill to the table. Earlier I mentioned that the hole in the table had to be a bit wider than the mill opening. The reasoning is so that you can get a socket up there to tighten the two bolts.Posted ImageThe last thing I added to my mill, and I suggest one of these even if you don’t motorize, is an extended hopper. I basically took a thin plywood and pieced one together with a nailgun. Final product shots:Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImageThanks to all the brewers out there that posted their experience with similar projects and to Walt for the wiring diagram.Jim Yeager


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