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Perry recipe?


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#1 northbound

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 08:17 PM

A friend will soon have bushels of pears and is in need of a Perry recipe. Either wine or Melomel recipes would be appreciated. :)


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#2 northbound

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Posted 25 August 2013 - 08:29 PM

I made my perry traditionally, as just a hard cider. Pressed pear juice and yeast. Bottle carbed. Delicious.

Would your cyser recipe, which is awesome BTW, work equally well for perry?


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#3 Genesee Ted

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 03:37 PM

I love perry.  One common fault that I notice in a lot of HB examples I have had is that a lot of the pear flavor has gone away.  I am not exactly sure how to avoid this, but one thing that I think could help is to ferment on the cooler end of your chosen yeast to avoid scrubbing a lot of that pear character out.  



#4 Genesee Ted

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 04:44 PM

Very good choice.  Cote de Blanc is another one that does a great job at that 



#5 miccullen

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 05:39 PM

I used a wine yeast, ICV K1V-1116. That's a great choice for retaining fruit characteristics.

yep, but you have to let it age a bit to get rid of the sulphur, otherwise it is a great fruit wine yeast IME


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#6 northbound

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 05:57 PM

I made my perry traditionally, as just a hard cider. Pressed pear juice and yeast. Bottle carbed. Delicious.

 

Hm. Maybe? The acid contributions are different, with pears being less tart overall. It might work. Pears and raisins and such are good combos in general. How many bushels of pears? If there's enough juice, I'd try it out!

 So basically, juice, raisins, yeast? How many pounds/ounces of raisins for a 5 gallon batch? 


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#7 neddles

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 08:07 PM

Any idea what pear varieties you will be getting?


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#8 northbound

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 05:41 AM

Any idea what pear varieties you will be getting?

Don't know, I'll ask.

See the property belongs to a friend who said he has a good crop of pears this year, wants to make wine or melomel from the pears he doesn't sell at the farmer's markets. Told him I would look into it and help him out. Neither of us have made a perry, I'm just gathering as much information as possible. BTW,This thread has been very help-I do appreciate it !


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#9 armagh

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 06:11 AM

I love perry.  One common fault that I notice in a lot of HB examples I have had is that a lot of the pear flavor has gone away.  I am not exactly sure how to avoid this, but one thing that I think could help is to ferment on the cooler end of your chosen yeast to avoid scrubbing a lot of that pear character out.  

Another option, assuming you have sufficient juice, is to freeze 1 gallon.  When fermentation is about done, take the 1 gallon container (I use plastic jugs - yeah, I know), invert it, and collect a half gallon of what is essentially concentrate.  Add that to the must in increments until it tastes the way you want it.  Did this a couple of times with reisling grape juice to make pyment, idea from the complete meadmaker.


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#10 Genesee Ted

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 02:31 PM

Another option, assuming you have sufficient juice, is to freeze 1 gallon.  When fermentation is about done, take the 1 gallon container (I use plastic jugs - yeah, I know), invert it, and collect a half gallon of what is essentially concentrate.  Add that to the must in increments until it tastes the way you want it.  Did this a couple of times with reisling grape juice to make pyment, idea from the complete meadmaker.

Awesome suggestion.  +1



#11 miccullen

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 04:17 PM

Another option, assuming you have sufficient juice, is to freeze 1 gallon.  When fermentation is about done, take the 1 gallon container (I use plastic jugs - yeah, I know), invert it, and collect a half gallon of what is essentially concentrate.  Add that to the must in increments until it tastes the way you want it.  Did this a couple of times with reisling grape juice to make pyment, idea from the complete meadmaker.

jus reserve? 

 

works very nicely with cider too


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#12 Genesee Ted

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 04:33 PM

When I was working as a chef, I used to reduce cider to a molasses with heat.  I wonder how that would work in this application...



#13 miccullen

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 05:20 PM

When I was working as a chef, I used to reduce cider to a molasses with heat.  I wonder how that would work in this application...

I've sused frozen concentrates to sweeten ciders, similar concept, but with more caramelization?


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