Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Aging Mels


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 EWW

EWW

    Regular, normal human being

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 23625 posts
  • LocationSomewhere special

Posted 20 May 2012 - 10:26 AM

In the experience of the board is there a time when these start to decline or do they continue to improve with age? I have a good stock right now and want to let a good majority of it age for a long stretch unless I'll see deminishing returns in quality. I know this is a vague question, but I have a combination of meads in the 11-14% range with both light and dark fruits...just looking for a general rule of thumb answer here. 2 yrs, 4 yrs, more?
  • 0

#2 armagh

armagh

    Grumpy Frost Giant

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6670 posts
  • LocationBandit Country

Posted 20 May 2012 - 10:51 AM

There is no persuasive answer for this question that I have heard. So much depends on ingredients, process, care in handling (avoidance of oxygen exposure, for ex.) and storage conditions. Add to that alcohol strength, acidity and some other variables and you have a gamut of affecting factors. If you don't get 2-4 years post bottling, I'd say something went wrong along the way. A friend once opened an 18-year-old mead he'd made that he'd corked, put shrunk foil over and waxed the foil. It was outstanding. I've never been that patient.

Edited by armagh, 20 May 2012 - 10:51 AM.

  • 0

#3 EWW

EWW

    Regular, normal human being

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 23625 posts
  • LocationSomewhere special

Posted 20 May 2012 - 11:14 AM

Thanks - I guess I was thinking the lighter fruit meads (peach/apricot) would age similar to commercial white wines.
  • 0

#4 Genesee Ted

Genesee Ted

    yabba dabba doob

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 42210 posts
  • LocationRochester, NY

Posted 20 May 2012 - 07:12 PM

I have an apricot mel that is 4 plus years old that is 18% ish. It was hot for a long time but is really mellowing out. The evolution of it has been pretty incredible. If a mead is stored in absence of O2, I think that they can go decades. I have a multiberry mel that is a few years old as well that is also money. Drink them as you go, but be conservative and save a few for analysis.

#5 EWW

EWW

    Regular, normal human being

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 23625 posts
  • LocationSomewhere special

Posted 20 May 2012 - 08:34 PM

My apricot/peach Mel is nice now ... Good solid tartness and huge fruit taste/aroma. I'm thinkng about back sweetening but don 't want to turn this into a wine cooler. Does that acidity mellow a bit from your experience?
  • 0

#6 armagh

armagh

    Grumpy Frost Giant

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6670 posts
  • LocationBandit Country

Posted 21 May 2012 - 07:15 AM

My apricot/peach Mel is nice now ... Good solid tartness and huge fruit taste/aroma. I'm thinkng about back sweetening but don 't want to turn this into a wine cooler. Does that acidity mellow a bit from your experience?

It should to some extent. Acidity will help the mead sustain in the bottle. When it gets to the point where there's no acidity on your palate, the mead is likely at it's tipping point.
  • 0


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users