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Fermentation start time


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#1 Corbin

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 05:49 AM

What's the average time for you guys for your fermentation to start. Made my mead last night and pitched the yeast starter at 9:30pm. When I left the house this morning at 6:30 there was no activity at all. If this was a beer I would be very nervous. Not sure if this a normal lag time. I do not have an O2 tank so I used the shake method for oxygenating.
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#2 Genesee Ted

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 06:06 AM

Did you rehydrate your yeast? Also, how much and what kind of yeast? What temp is it at?

#3 Corbin

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 06:17 AM

I used a Wyeast liquid smack pack and made a starter. Can't quite remember off the top of my head 3964? It's a combination of those numbers. It's at 65 degrees. I did this batch on a whim and against my normal way of doing things by not knowing ahead of tme what I was doing. Ordered The Compleat Meadmaker last night. Just hope this 5g batch isn't a total waste.
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#4 Genesee Ted

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 06:31 AM

If the yeast was active, it will be fine. It will probably be bubbling when you get home

#5 MtnBrewer

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 07:35 AM

If the yeast was active, it will be fine. It will probably be bubbling when you get home

And if somehow it wasn't, you can always pick up some 71B.

#6 armagh

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 07:45 AM

Were you able to check the pH?
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#7 Corbin

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:05 AM

Were you able to check the pH?

No. I don't have any pH strips.
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#8 Corbin

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 09:17 AM

Here was the starter recipe I used:Ingredients:6.5 cups of water0.25 teaspoon of yeast nutrient0.25 teaspon of yeast energizer1 tablespoon of Light Dry Malt Extract0.5 cups of honeyEquipment:1 gallon glass jug (sanitized)1 funnel (sanitized)Small potDirections:Add water, yeast nutrient, energizer, and malt extract together in the small pot and bring to a boil for 15 minutes. Remove from heat and add honey, cover and let sit until it reaches room temperature. Pour mixture into glass jug using the funnel. Add yeast and cover top with some aluminum foil. Shake vigorously to oxgeniate. Let it sit somewhere at room temperature away from light for a day or two. Siphon most of the liquid off of the yeast at the bottom of the jug, but leave enough to mix up the bulk of the yeast into a slurry. Pitch the entire slurry into your fermenter.
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#9 armagh

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 12:15 PM

IMO, that's usually not an issue before fermentation starts.

My experience differs from that opinion. Apparently I am not alone.https://home.comcast...otCarbonate.pdf
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#10 MtnBrewer

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 12:38 PM

My experience differs from that opinion. Apparently I am not alone.https://home.comcast...otCarbonate.pdf

I've never had an issue but it's certainly something to be cognizant of. Some honeys are more acidic than others. OB in particular is pretty acidic. I always check pH after I mix up the must and a few times I've been borderline but the yeast started anyway.

#11 armagh

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 01:17 PM

Typically, the only time a home meadmaker needs to worry about starting must pH is when a recipe calls for acid blend in the beginning, which should obviously never happen. I haven't run across any honey/fruit/water combinations yet that affected my pH prior to fermentation.

Again, I can't agree, but to each their own.
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#12 armagh

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 03:40 PM

I'd argue you are not typical or average.

I've never been accused of being typical or normal. In terms of mead making experience, however, I'd submit there's a reason HT wrote a protocol on the subject, but I don't come here to argue, so I'll leave it at that.
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#13 *_Guest_BigBossMan_*

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 05:14 PM

I do not have an O2 tank so I used the shake method for oxygenating.

I seem to remember someone suggesting using a large whisk when mixing the honey and water together for 02 exchange.
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#14 MtnBrewer

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 05:24 PM

I seem to remember someone suggesting using a large whisk when mixing the honey and water together for 02 exchange.

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#15 Corbin

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 06:50 PM

Not used to not seeing a lot of krausen during a fermentation. Steady jets of bubbles hitting the surface. Definitely wouldn't call it a vigorous fermentation.
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#16 miccullen

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 07:46 PM

Not used to not seeing a lot of krausen during a fermentation. Steady jets of bubbles hitting the surface. Definitely wouldn't call it a vigorous fermentation.

you should try watching a pure sugar brew, it's like watching a carboy of cloudy champagne
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#17 MtnBrewer

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 07:06 AM

There won't be any krausen. Steady jets of bubbles is what I'd call a good solid fermentation.

#18 Corbin

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 08:34 AM

There won't be any krausen. Steady jets of bubbles is what I'd call a good solid fermentation.

Awesome!Do you guys oxygenate for the first three days or just at the beginning?
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#19 MtnBrewer

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 08:36 AM

I usually oxygenate when I do the nutrient additions. Some people like to do an open fermentation for the first week or so.

#20 Corbin

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 08:42 AM

I don't mean to sound like sanitation isn't important but the more I read about meadmaking it is very different than beer brewing. I wouldn't dare open my fermenter for beer once the yeast is pitched let alone three days in a row.
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