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kegging cider


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#1 Mando

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 08:33 AM

Anyone do it? Any different than beer? Will it make the keg unusable for beer after or will I be able to get the taste/smell out? Number of volumes that are typical?
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#2 *_Guest_BigBossMan_*

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 09:13 AM

Anyone do it? Any different than beer? Will it make the keg unusable for beer after or will I be able to get the taste/smell out? Number of volumes that are typical?

I'm pretty sure ScottS does. I've never even made cider. Something I intend to rectify this fall.
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#3 miccullen

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 09:45 AM

no different than beer in my experience
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#4 Mando

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 10:25 AM

so how about the keg? does it become a "cider keg" until you change the o-rings?
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#5 miccullen

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 10:43 AM

so how about the keg? does it become a "cider keg" until you change the o-rings?

never noticed any lingering flavornow root beer on the other hand...never, ever again
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#6 Mando

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 07:03 PM

never noticed any lingering flavornow root beer on the other hand...never, ever again

i got a used keg that obviously had root beer in it. to this day that o-ring despite my best efforts smells like root beer. i keep it around as an example for people.
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#7 Genesee Ted

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 04:41 AM

The only thing I do differently when kegging cider is to use a higher pressure.

#8 Mando

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 01:36 PM

The only thing I do differently when kegging cider is to use a higher pressure.

really? does cider need more pressure to hit a similar volume of co2 compared to beer or do you like your cider really fizzy?eta: if they are similar - can I use my beer volumes of co2 vs pressure and temperature chart to figure this out?
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#9 miccullen

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 01:49 PM

really? does cider need more pressure to hit a similar volume of co2 compared to beer or do you like your cider really fizzy?eta: if they are similar - can I use my beer volumes of co2 vs pressure and temperature chart to figure this out?

should work fine
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#10 Mando

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 04:31 PM

so how many volumes do you guys usually go for?
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#11 Genesee Ted

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:08 AM

I have honestly never done any calculations based on volumes. I just set the CO2 to whatever I think is right. This is probably very amaturish but it works for me. For cider I will hit it with 25-30 PSI. All of the traditional commercial ciders I have ever tried have been more highly carbed than beer I think. I do like a fizzy cider

#12 Mando

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 03:12 PM

I have honestly never done any calculations based on volumes. I just set the CO2 to whatever I think is right. This is probably very amaturish but it works for me. For cider I will hit it with 25-30 PSI. All of the traditional commercial ciders I have ever tried have been more highly carbed than beer I think. I do like a fizzy cider

I was figuring that I might bottle a couple with no/low carbonation just to see and force carb the rest. If I end up thinking it's too fizzy I can just slowly decarb it.
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#13 Genesee Ted

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 04:02 PM

One thing about cider which is a consideration when carbing up versus beer is that it doesn't have all of the head forming proteins. Because of this, it can handle a lot more gas.

#14 43hertz

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:39 PM

I pressurize to 25 PSI more or less for two days and then reduce back to 8 to serve.
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#15 Mando

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 11:25 AM

what temp do you guys serve cider at? another few weeks and i'll be kegging this beyotch.
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#16 Mando

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 11:31 AM

I carb really high volumes. You'll have almost no head on cider. I like dry ciders, and having a ton of carbonation really helps with that goal.I serve at the same temps as beer.

i have a good feeling about this batch. it naturally fermented and all signs are that it went well. it's super clear in the carboy right now.
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