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This sound OK?


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#1 shaggaroo

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 04:28 PM

I call it 3:10 to Yuma... why? because I had happened to finish watching the movie a couple of days before brewing this a while back and decided on the 33% each of pils, vienna, and wheat, and to get my numbers that meant 3 lbs 10 oz of each. Probably mash about 149/150 ºF.

 

Thoughts appreciated! Any idea what "style" this might be? Though as doob's sig file will tell you I'm not big on styles, but just curious.

 

Thanks!

 

Pils, Vienna, Wheat, 3 lb 10 oz each

Hallertauer Mittelfrüh, 24-ish IBU at 60 mins

Yeast = 34/70


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#2 ER Pemberton

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Posted 24 January 2020 - 04:38 PM

I think it will be great.  You could kind-of sort-of call it a helles (the pils, the vienna, the hops and the yeast) but the wheat throws that out the window.  Even the Vienna may be too much just based on the percentage.  Call it a gold lager.  Call it an American Helles.  Call it a lawnmower beer.  If you had used an ale yeast I would say to just call it a blonde ale.  Maybe a "blonde lager" although that's not a style.  It absolutely looks like something I would make, especially as a "clean out the closet" beer where I was using the last of certain grains.  It will be balanced, refreshing and smashable.  Keep us posted on how it comes out.  



#3 shaggaroo

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 09:36 AM

Thanks Ken, this is the kind of encouragement I was looking for :) First time I brewed it using Kölsch yeast, but this time my available temps in the house are not good for that. In the house, 68 ºF, in the room between garage and house it's 50 ºF, so I figure lager yeast it is.


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#4 ER Pemberton

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Posted 25 January 2020 - 11:17 AM

34/70 will give it a great character.

#5 Bklmt2000

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Posted 26 January 2020 - 07:00 AM

I call it 3:10 to Yuma... why? because I had happened to finish watching the movie a couple of days before brewing this a while back and decided on the 33% each of pils, vienna, and wheat, and to get my numbers that meant 3 lbs 10 oz of each. Probably mash about 149/150 ºF.

 

Thoughts appreciated! Any idea what "style" this might be? Though as doob's sig file will tell you I'm not big on styles, but just curious.

 

Thanks!

 

Pils, Vienna, Wheat, 3 lb 10 oz each

Hallertauer Mittelfrüh, 24-ish IBU at 60 mins

Yeast = 34/70

 

I think it will be great.  You could kind-of sort-of call it a helles (the pils, the vienna, the hops and the yeast) but the wheat throws that out the window.  Even the Vienna may be too much just based on the percentage.  Call it a gold lager.  Call it an American Helles.  Call it a lawnmower beer.  If you had used an ale yeast I would say to just call it a blonde ale.  Maybe a "blonde lager" although that's not a style.  It absolutely looks like something I would make, especially as a "clean out the closet" beer where I was using the last of certain grains.  It will be balanced, refreshing and smashable.  Keep us posted on how it comes out.  

Looks like a solid recipe for a pale, fizzy, crushable lager.  The kind of beer you could pound a couple of after working in the yard on a hot day.

 

Depending on batch size and efficiency, you're probably right in the 5.5-6% abv range, which would be a nice point to be satisfying without getting trashed.  And 24 IBUs of Hall Mitt should balance the malt nicely without screaming out "hoppy".

 

And to Ken's point, 34/70 will make a stellar lager.  If you can keep the fermentation temps in the low 50's, you're golden, and if the temp creeps up to 60° or so, you won't be able to tell much if any difference taste-wise.


Edited by Bklmt2000, 26 January 2020 - 07:01 AM.

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#6 shaggaroo

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Posted 26 January 2020 - 07:58 AM

Looks like a solid recipe for a pale, fizzy, crushable lager.  The kind of beer you could pound a couple of after working in the yard on a hot day.

 

Depending on batch size and efficiency, you're probably right in the 5.5-6% abv range, which would be a nice point to be satisfying without getting trashed.  And 24 IBUs of Hall Mitt should balance the malt nicely without screaming out "hoppy".

 

And to Ken's point, 34/70 will make a stellar lager.  If you can keep the fermentation temps in the low 50's, you're golden, and if the temp creeps up to 60° or so, you won't be able to tell much if any difference taste-wise.

good to know... so far the temp is pretty stable at 52 ºF... I have it in the room between the garage and the house, which I refer to as the airlock :)


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#7 ER Pemberton

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Posted 26 January 2020 - 08:22 AM

good to know... so far the temp is pretty stable at 52 ºF... I have it in the room between the garage and the house, which I refer to as the airlock :)

Next assignment:  Figure out what else you're going to make with the blob of 34/70 when this one is done.  ;)




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