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Is slurry with DH in it re-usable?


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#1 Poptop

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 06:16 AM

Title asks it all.  Please advise if you re-use.  I only dry hopped with a total of 1.5 ounces; El Dorado and Mandarina.  


Edited by Poptop, 19 August 2019 - 06:16 AM.

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#2 HVB

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 06:19 AM

What style beer are you using it in?  If it will be something with character and hops I would re-use it.  Let it settle in a jar and take the middle of it.  If you are going into a blonde ale I may use something new?

 

Just my nickle.


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#3 Poptop

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 06:24 AM

^^ oddly enough a blonde ale would likely be the next use so there you go.  It's 1728 Scottish.  When I made my starter I did save off a little for future use.  The slurry is from an American Amber.


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#4 jayb151

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 06:33 AM

I'd wash it, especially if you're using it in such a light style. But after washing, I wouldn't think twice!


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#5 Bklmt2000

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 06:45 AM

I'd wash it, especially if you're using it in such a light style. But after washing, I wouldn't think twice!

 

This.  Washing is pretty quick and easy insurance that the hop character from the prior batch doesn't carry over into the new one.


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#6 Poptop

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 06:48 AM

Thanks fellas


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#7 Genesee Ted

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 10:14 AM

I wouldn’t use it without washing and then building it back up. Hops are really bad for yeast viability so if you absolutely need to reuse a cake, make a stepped up starter. I’m friends with the head yeast guy at Genny. His advice is to ditch it.

#8 Poptop

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 10:27 AM

^^^^    Yea, I can appreciate this.  That's why I typically save a pinch from any starter I make.  That way I have enough to light up 4-8 ounces of DME and make fresh.  

 

Thank you


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#9 denny

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 01:06 PM

I'd wash it, especially if you're using it in such a light style. But after washing, I wouldn't think twice!

 

I assume you mean rinse it


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#10 Zsasz

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 01:25 PM

I wouldn’t use it without washing and then building it back up. Hops are really bad for yeast viability so if you absolutely need to reuse a cake, make a stepped up starter. I’m friends with the head yeast guy at Genny. His advice is to ditch it.


Ignoring the possible flavor contribution from the hops for a moment is it safe to assume viability concerns due to this is pretty much zero if you are using immediately after racking (for instance next day)? If I use a yeast cake it is often 2 weeks after pitching the yeast in the first batch.

Edited by Zsasz, 19 August 2019 - 01:25 PM.

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#11 Poptop

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 01:30 PM

Ignoring the possible flavor contribution from the hops for a moment is it safe to assume viability concerns due to this is pretty much zero if you are using immediately after racking (for instance next day)? If I use a yeast cake it is often 2 weeks after pitching the yeast in the first batch.

 

Very rarely am I luck enough to dump onto a cake.  It's usually chillin in a Mason jar for a couple weeks.  I very rarely DH and that's one reason I pulled a little amount of starter away from the batch.  When I rack out of the kettle into a fermenter I strain through a double mesh strainer which catches almost all of the hop debris.  I pitch slurry all the time.


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#12 Bklmt2000

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 02:03 PM

Ignoring the possible flavor contribution from the hops for a moment is it safe to assume viability concerns due to this is pretty much zero if you are using immediately after racking (for instance next day)? If I use a yeast cake it is often 2 weeks after pitching the yeast in the first batch.

 

assuming the batch fermented normally, yes.


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#13 jayb151

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 06:46 PM

I assume you mean rinse it

 

Probably Denny! I'm not 100% what the difference is, but what I do mean is that I'd be adding water to the yeast slurry and let the hop bits settle out so I can pour off yeast and dump the hops.

 

cheers!


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#14 Genesee Ted

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 06:49 PM

Well, I’ve been through this with my friend a bunch of times. He says that he is asked this question more than any other. He runs a million dollar plus yeast lab and his advice is dump it. That being said, he has a lot more on the line than a 5-10 gal batch. They have to be super consistent. If you don’t hit the same attenuation, you’ve still got beer that you’ll drink. For them, it means possibly making a batch where they overcompensate the other way to blend it. That’s ignoring flavor contributions. You’ll make beer.

#15 Genesee Ted

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Posted 19 August 2019 - 06:56 PM

I assume you mean rinse it

So this is kind of a point of contention for some people. I know brewers who are concerned that another possible reason to not repitch dry hopped yeast is contamination from the hops. But again, the main reason is a massive drop in viability. If anyone has access to a microscope, it’s pretty easy to see with methylene blue dye.

Rinse vs wash: rinse is just water to take out solids. Wash uses phosphoric acid to try to kill some small amounts of bacteria.

#16 jayb151

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 09:55 AM

Ah! then yes, I totally mean rinse. haha


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#17 denny

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 01:09 PM

Probably Denny! I'm not 100% what the difference is, but what I do mean is that I'd be adding water to the yeast slurry and let the hop bits settle out so I can pour off yeast and dump the hops.

 

cheers!

 

Washing inplies acid washing it.  Using only water is rinsing.


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