Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

English Pale Ale


  • Please log in to reply
21 replies to this topic

#1 zymot

zymot

    Comptroller of Small Amounts of Money

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 22538 posts
  • LocationMortville

Posted 18 August 2019 - 09:40 AM

Next beer, looking to make a English style pale ale.

 

Here is what I am thinking so far:

 

OG 1.056 IBU 50 IBU

 

Base malt: Maris Otter

Boil hops: Northern Brewer 60 minutes

Flavor & Aroma hops: EKG 30, 15, 10, 5 minute

Yeast: British Ale yeast, per the LHBS current inventory. (White Labs, Wyeast & Omega are well stocked)

 

As a home brewer, I want to (have to) add a bit more.

 

8%-10% British crystal 20-40L

Plus

8%-10% something extra. Biscuit, victory, suggest something.

 

Maybe blend the Maris Otter with another base malt. I know sugar is common in a English pale ale maybe I can be talked into it.

 

Any suggestions?

,

 

 


  • 0

#2 neddles

neddles

    No Life

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 12255 posts

Posted 18 August 2019 - 10:28 AM

I enjoy English crystals in general but in a beer like this and at 8-10% of the grist I would stick with a lighter crystal (10-20L) for my tastes. Carastan is very nice at like 35-40L but I would drop the percentage if you go with that one. I would only add sugar if you are looking to reduce malt flavor or are insistent on some degree of historical authenticity.


  • 0

#3 Mando

Mando

    Anti-Brag Queen

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 40399 posts
  • LocationLimbo

Posted 18 August 2019 - 12:11 PM

I agree on no sugar.  mash kind of highish.  I don't bother with hops other than start of boil or from the 15 minute mark on.  30 mins just seems like almost all IBUs and no flavor/aroma.  if you use something like victory go really light.  like for a 5 gallon batch I would keep it under 3-4oz for sure.


  • 0

#4 Bklmt2000

Bklmt2000

    Five Way Expert

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 9752 posts
  • LocationCincinnati, OH

Posted 18 August 2019 - 12:33 PM

Here's an English ale I brewed last week: (for 5.5 post-boil gallons in the 1°)

 

10lb Maris Otter

0.5lb wheat malt

0.5lb C-60

 

for an OG of ~1.060.  Mash rested at ~150-151° for a solid hour before recirc and sparging.

 

Pilgrim for bittering, with First Gold and EKG for the late additions (15, 10, 5, and flameout), for ~50 IBUs total.

 

A fresh decanted starter of WY1028 is handling the heavy lifting in the primary, which is slowing down now but smells fantastic.

 

To my tastes, MO has a noticeable biscuit character as is, so adding a biscuity character malt (Victory, Spec Roast, etc.) can be good, but IMO should be kept on the low side; Morty's suggestion of 3-4 oz for 5 gal is a good place to start.

 

I'd also forego the sugar, at least on the first attempt, and see how the beer turns out. 

 

Worst-case, you get a beer that's close to (or maybe dead on) what you intended, and if need be, tweak next time to dial it in further. 

 

That said, I think the recipe in the OP looks solid and one I'd brew as posted.


  • 0

#5 zymot

zymot

    Comptroller of Small Amounts of Money

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 22538 posts
  • LocationMortville

Posted 18 August 2019 - 02:27 PM

Go points everybody.

 

I like the northern brewer/EKG combinations. I have used this combo a few times and been happy. (I always stay away from fuggles).

 

I will reduce the crystal impact and lower L° in the crystal and/or lower the parentage.

 

No sugar.

 

I tend to error on the side of simple. I will re-think the victory, biscuit, etc. Perhaps straight forward maris otter should be enough,

 

I was talking with a professional brewer who was a former homebrewer. I asked him have he learned or what was different between the two processes. The first thing he mentioned was recipe formulation. Homebrew recipes tend be complex with a busy grainbill. Commercial recipes, are pretty straight forward.n 2, or 3 malts in the grainbill. Which makes sense, does a brewery want to inventory and have partial sacks of 15 different malts? Probably not,


  • 0

#6 Mando

Mando

    Anti-Brag Queen

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 40399 posts
  • LocationLimbo

Posted 18 August 2019 - 04:17 PM

I was talking with a professional brewer who was a former homebrewer. I asked him have he learned or what was different between the two processes. The first thing he mentioned was recipe formulation. Homebrew recipes tend be complex with a busy grainbill. Commercial recipes, are pretty straight forward.n 2, or 3 malts in the grainbill. Which makes sense, does a brewery want to inventory and have partial sacks of 15 different malts? Probably not,

 

I think most homebrewers that stick with this hobby long enough go through the complex malt bill phase and then come out the other side realizing that less complex is usually the way to go.


  • 0

#7 pkrone

pkrone

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 435 posts
  • LocationTejas

Posted 19 August 2019 - 09:22 AM

I think most homebrewers that stick with this hobby long enough go through the complex malt bill phase and then come out the other side realizing that less complex is usually the way to go.

 

 

Exactly!

 

I've always liked something similar to Northern Brewer's "The Innkeeper":  Golden Promise, dark crystal, and corn sugar


  • 0

#8 HVB

HVB

    No Life

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14969 posts
  • LocationPalmer, MA

Posted 19 August 2019 - 10:03 AM

I think most homebrewers that stick with this hobby long enough go through the complex malt bill phase and then come out the other side realizing that less complex is usually the way to go.

 Agree.  Most of my beers these days are really simple.  Smokey Brown is the only beer left that has a lot of malt and I am just not going to mess with that one at this point.


  • 0

#9 Poptop

Poptop

    Frequent Member

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4816 posts
  • LocationCoconut Creek, FL

Posted 19 August 2019 - 10:11 AM

I think most homebrewers that stick with this hobby long enough go through the complex malt bill phase and then come out the other side realizing that less complex is usually the way to go.

 

Also on board.  I'm toying with the idea of a Milk Stout and after reading all the recipes online, I sorta cringe at all the specialty malts I'd have to get haha.  


  • 0

#10 HVB

HVB

    No Life

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14969 posts
  • LocationPalmer, MA

Posted 19 August 2019 - 10:28 AM

Also on board.  I'm toying with the idea of a Milk Stout and after reading all the recipes online, I sorta cringe at all the specialty malts I'd have to get haha.  

My milk stout has 5 malts.

 

TR

C-60

C-40

Chocolate

RB

 

I am sure I could combine the crystal if I wanted.


  • 0

#11 Mando

Mando

    Anti-Brag Queen

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 40399 posts
  • LocationLimbo

Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:28 PM

 Agree.  Most of my beers these days are really simple.  Smokey Brown is the only beer left that has a lot of malt and I am just not going to mess with that one at this point.

 

didn't know you still made that one!  maybe I should try it as is.  you have the current recipe handy?


  • 0

#12 zymot

zymot

    Comptroller of Small Amounts of Money

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 22538 posts
  • LocationMortville

Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:34 PM

I am travelling for work Tue - Sat. I want to brew on Sunday. That requires I get everything today.

I went to the LHBS and purchased:

12# Maris Otter
1# Baird's carastan
1# briess 20 L British crystal
1 pkg Omega OYL-011 yeast (Wyeast 1318)

German northern brewer and kent golding pellets.

I am not determined to use all of the malt. Figured better to get too much and get a brew day in.

My inclination is

11# MO
.75# carastan
.25# 20L crystal

45-55 IBU north brewer @ 60 min (depends on mash efficiency)
Goldings throughout the last 15 minutes.
  • 0

#13 Mando

Mando

    Anti-Brag Queen

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 40399 posts
  • LocationLimbo

Posted 19 August 2019 - 04:49 PM

Sounds great!
  • 0

#14 HVB

HVB

    No Life

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14969 posts
  • LocationPalmer, MA

Posted 19 August 2019 - 05:30 PM

didn't know you still made that one! maybe I should try it as is. you have the current recipe handy?


I will post it up in the morning.
  • 0

#15 zymot

zymot

    Comptroller of Small Amounts of Money

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 22538 posts
  • LocationMortville

Posted 19 August 2019 - 10:03 PM

Exactly!

I've always liked something similar to Northern Brewer's "The Innkeeper": Golden Promise, dark crystal, and corn sugar


I know I am an odd duck. I like pain hot dog and hamburgers. Bun & meat. That is it. No mustard, no ketchup, no relish. I like the bun toasted. Something about the essence of what you are drinking or eating. Why cover up or mask the foundation or the base. Rely on the quality of your ingredients and your talent as a brewer shine through and be the star of the show.
  • 0

#16 jayb151

jayb151

    Frequent Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1106 posts
  • LocationBatavia

Posted 20 August 2019 - 09:58 AM

Man, honestly, just reading through this has got me wanting to get some nice light English ales going...

 

There's something about that crystal clear, amber pint that gets me excited.


  • 0

#17 zymot

zymot

    Comptroller of Small Amounts of Money

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 22538 posts
  • LocationMortville

Posted 20 August 2019 - 01:52 PM

I like hoppy beers just fine. They are very easy to find, difficult to avoid. Seems like any commercial pale ale is going to be citrus hop forward.
  • 0

#18 neddles

neddles

    No Life

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 12255 posts

Posted 20 August 2019 - 02:19 PM

Man, honestly, just reading through this has got me wanting to get some nice light English ales going...

 

There's something about that crystal clear, amber pint that gets me excited.

 

Right there with you.


  • 0

#19 miccullen

miccullen

    Cheap Blue Meanie

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 63084 posts
  • LocationSpokane, WA

Posted 31 August 2019 - 11:35 AM

My milk stout has 5 malts.

 

TR

C-60

C-40

Chocolate

RB

 

I am sure I could combine the crystal if I wanted.

LOL at myself, I just spent way too long trying to figure out which maltster made TR,not sure I've seen it abbreviated such before  :lol:  :facepalm:


  • 0

#20 HVB

HVB

    No Life

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14969 posts
  • LocationPalmer, MA

Posted 31 August 2019 - 04:14 PM

LOL at myself, I just spent way too long trying to figure out which maltster made TR,not sure I've seen it abbreviated such before :lol: :facepalm:


Lol... Sorry on my poor abbreviation. I will often have various two row so my brew sheets just say TR. Glad you broke my code.
  • 0


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users