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First Meal from the finished kitchen....


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#21 AspenLeif

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 02:28 PM

:cheers: MB
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#22 Trub L

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 03:01 PM

FTR..My dad taught me trinity was carrots, onion, celery, too.

 

That's a mirepoix.  A trinity is celery, bell pepper and onion.  I'm sure your dad was great in other ways, though.  :P


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#23 Clintama

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 03:03 PM

That's a mirepoix.  A trinity is celery, bell pepper and onion.  I'm sure your dad was great in other ways, though.   :P

Yup, you don't put carrots in a gumbo.


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#24 HERMSman

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 03:38 PM

A holy trinity in cooking is essentially a flavour base and is typically arrived at by sauteing a combination of any three aromatic vegetables, herbs or spices. Cooking these few base ingredients in butter or oil releases their flavour, which is, in turn, infused into a mixture when other ingredients are added. This technique is most typically used when creating sauces, soups, stews and stir-fries.

Perhaps the most notorious holy trinity referred to in cuisine (particularly by world-renowned Louisiana chef Paul Prudhomme) is the Cajun Holy Trinity. It's an ingredient team that forms the flavour base of almost every Cajun (and Creole) dish imaginable (gumbo, jambalaya, etoufée; to name a few) and consists of chopped bell peppers (usually green), onions and celery. Though the Cajun Holy Trinity varies slightly from region to region (sometimes tomato or garlic are substitutes for celery) and additional spices like cayenne pepper, parsley, thyme and bay leaves can be used in concert with it, it's a prime example of how essential certain ingredients are to a specific type of cuisine.

Onions, carrots and celery form the holy trinity commonly referred to as a mirepoix. Originating in French cuisine (and named after a French town), the mirepoix has become a classic culinary trio serving as flavour base for numerous soup, stew and sauce recipes. To prepare a mirepoix, the aromatic vegetables are finely chopped and combined in a traditional 2:1:1 ratio of onions, carrots and celery. The sweetness of these vegetables is brought out by gently cooking them in butter. Variations might include a white mirepoix, which substitutes either parsnips or the white part of leeks for the carrots; a mirepoix au gras, in which ham and/or pork bellies are added to the original mirepoix; or a matignon, which sees ham and mushrooms added.


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#25 miccullen

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 03:49 PM

looks damned good moon!


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#26 bshep

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 04:25 PM

I love Zrazy Polskie. I see you spell it Czezy I guess our ancestors are from different regions. Is that maybe a Czech spelling?


Edited by bshep714, 13 November 2013 - 04:29 PM.

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#27 weeper

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 04:47 PM

That's a mirepoix. A trinity is celery, bell pepper and onion. I'm sure your dad was great in other ways, though. :P

:D I heard you the first time, Tater**. I'm trying to expand your knowledge base. Some people refer to onions/bell peppers/celery as "the" cooking holy trinity, but it's really just the Cajun Trinity. a cooking trinity just refers to there being a combo of three (see Hermsman's quote). A just as common trinity is carrots/celery/ onion, like Guv said - French trinity. Mirepoix simply refers to "a mixture of sautéed root vegetables used as a base for braising meat or for various sauces " by definition. I also thought it had to do with them being finely chopped, and the ratio being 2:1:1 -- but I'm not certain. I'm curious to know the direct translation for the French word, of anyone can find it. I'm on a phone. **Also acceptable as nicknames for Lou, depending on the region of the country you live in:Potator TitsSugar TotsMustang LucyClive

Edited by weepre, 13 November 2013 - 05:19 PM.

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#28 Anagallis arvensis

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:11 PM

I love Zrazy Polskie. I see you spell it Czezy I guess our ancestors are from different regions. Is that maybe a Czech spelling?

 

 

No.... typo..... Zrazy is right...... "Its Crazy with a Z"


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#29 bshep

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:32 PM

No.... typo..... Zrazy is right...... "Its Crazy with a Z"

Alright! Carry on with the good food!. Looks like Gma's BTW


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#30 Anagallis arvensis

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:32 PM

 So We cranked out about 5 dozen in about an hour on Sunday........ I make 6 dozen more on Monday....

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"Roomba", and "Dyson" are in place waiting to pounce

 

From there, its time to saute' some onions.. The minion is in the age bracket where unless its onion rings... onions are disgusting..... So I spent 2 hours cutting 3 onions up to micro sized pieces that would basically melt when they hit hot butter..... I told him later, he said..."meh, I like onions now...."

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After I removed the rolls from the dutch oven with the "lou-e-poix" in it, I added some cream, and milk.... I then whipped out my brand new immersion blender, and made one of the tastiest gravies evah!

 

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Dinner is served... I never made the red cabbage.. It was late..... Soo fuggin good!!!


Edited by MangTehMerciless, 13 November 2013 - 05:36 PM.

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#31 bshep

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:37 PM

My other favorite Polska food is Placek Po Zbojnicku (outlaw potato pancakes with pork goulash). Also, starting with pickle soup is a must!


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#32 Anagallis arvensis

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:41 PM

I've never had pickle soup.... I wanna make it... Next om my list is Golumpki, but I need to get a pressure cooker first


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#33 EWW

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:41 PM

Fry those pee-doggies bro and serve with brown butter....so worth the extra mess
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#34 AspenLeif

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:42 PM

Why? We make them often in a roaster or Dutch oven.MB
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#35 AspenLeif

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:43 PM

Also... Make city chicken. Your son will love it! Another detroit polish treat.MB
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#36 Anagallis arvensis

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:44 PM

I dunno, all these Pollacks in my family demand a pressure cooker


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#37 AspenLeif

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:46 PM

Bah..... No need.MB
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#38 Anagallis arvensis

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:50 PM

so Mainely... Check out the Kluski I made!!

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 So When I made the Pirogi I set the pasta maker for setting "4"... In retrospect "3" was good enough... "4" made them too delicate.....  Saute' without killing them was a bitch. So I had all the left over scraps, so we made a snake, and kept passing the dough through the rollers.... Got it down to an "8"  :shock: ... ZOMG sofa king delicious....... It was like FSM made the noodles himself!!!!


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#39 AspenLeif

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:52 PM

Throw a whollop of cottage cheese in there and cook for about 60 sec until it gets stringy. Yum!MB
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#40 Anagallis arvensis

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 05:57 PM

I was pissed I didn't get to the Kaputsa......... Oh well...... Next time.... 


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