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Raised bed garden.


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#1 BlackBeerd

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 12:55 PM

Not hijacking the other thread here. Im not much of a "gardener". Basically my SOP is to shove seeds in the ground and pick what grows. That being said, I don't get the point of raised beds. Can someone enlighten me?

Posted ImageTry building raised beds. The ones closest in the photos are 7 feet on a side and the dirt is about 2 feet deep.TillCross tillLay out beds.Start shoveling dirt into the beds making walkways.That's what I did last weekend.Posted ImagePosted ImageDetail of retaining wall.


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#2 DuncanDad

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 01:59 PM

Around here, our "dirt" is red clay-as in, you can make clay pots out of this stuff.The reason I do raised beds is to "fluff" the soil as far down as I can for growing root vegetables like carrots, beets and garlic.It gives me an opportunity to introduce organic matter into the soil so that it won't compact as tightly and fertilize nice and deep.It also helps grow more in a small area. I can pack the plants in tighter because I don't need as many rows to walk through. I can just kneel down and pick or weed as needed.
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#3 denny

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 02:11 PM

It also helps warm up the soil. We use no till "lasagne" style gardening in raised beds and I have nothing but great things to say about it.
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#4 Deerslyr

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 02:25 PM

Around here, our "dirt" is red clay-as in, you can make clay pots out of this stuff.The reason I do raised beds is to "fluff" the soil as far down as I can for growing root vegetables like carrots, beets and garlic.It gives me an opportunity to introduce organic matter into the soil so that it won't compact as tightly and fertilize nice and deep.It also helps grow more in a small area. I can pack the plants in tighter because I don't need as many rows to walk through. I can just kneel down and pick or weed as needed.

that
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#5 bigdaddyale

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 02:28 PM

https://www.gardener...e-KGPPreplanned https://en.wikipedia..._foot_gardeningPosted Image

Edited by bigdaddyale, 06 October 2012 - 02:31 PM.

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#6 djinkc

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 02:39 PM

It also helps warm up the soil. We use no till "lasagne" style gardening in raised beds and I have nothing but great things to say about it.

Spent grains go in there? I do, need more "green" in it though.
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#7 miccullen

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 02:40 PM

Spent grains go in there? I do, need more "green" in it though.

lawn clippings?
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#8 DuncanDad

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 03:40 PM

It also helps warm up the soil. We use no till "lasagne" style gardening in raised beds and I have nothing but great things to say about it.

We tried that method for several years. Our soil has way too much clay and iron in it right now.Granted, it's much better now than when I started the family garden 16 years ago. The "soil" then was so much compacted clay that I had to use a mattock to break up the soil. Tillers just bounced off the clay.
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#9 djinkc

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 03:50 PM

lawn clippings?

Nah, I mulch until the #$&@ing leaves start dropping - which will be soon. Maybe I will a bit next year for mulch. A lot of spent grains go in mine - the worms love it though. I like the no till idea but usually ~800 - 900 lbs of spent grains go in them in a year.
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#10 miccullen

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:01 PM

Nah, I mulch until the #$&@ing leaves start dropping - which will be soon. Maybe I will a bit next year for mulch. A lot of spent grains go in mine - the worms love it though. I like the no till idea but usually ~800 - 900 lbs of spent grains go in them in a year.

that more than enough nitrogen
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#11 BlackBeerd

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:32 PM

Looking at the work that goes into that, I think I would go ahead and make them three feet high so I would not have to bend over to work in it.

Edited by BlackBeerd, 06 October 2012 - 04:33 PM.

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#12 AspenLeif

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:37 PM

Our neighbor has one and a regular garden. He always complains about how much watering they need. Since they are raised, the water just drains through and into the earth below.MB
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#13 miccullen

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:40 PM

Our neighbor has one and a regular garden. He always complains about how much watering they need. Since they are raised, the water just drains through and into the earth below.MB

I think that can be dealt with by using a less permeable layer at the bottom such as clay
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#14 Vagus

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:43 PM

imma ####in imma ####kin imma fehwhuhkinTjhe bedis a pls to slee and youa hrink imma toufh you as an dright son>cherpse#### stay clean son
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#15 Augie91

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:43 PM

We do raised beds to utilize wasted hillside space.....Posted Image
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#16 orudis

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 04:44 PM

You usually want good drainage, which is part of the point of raised beds if you have a lot of clay.
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#17 Vagus

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 05:24 PM

imma ####in imma ####kin imma fehwhuhkinTjhe bedis a pls to slee and youa hrink imma toufh you as an dright son>cherpse#### stay clean son

Youre the man. You know that right?
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#18 BuxomBrewster

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 05:58 PM

You can also make hugelkultures for a raised bed type of situation. I made one this year. Not as easy to reach the top, but I'm sure that you could frame it up so it works better. It's a pile of logs, sticks and straw that you cover in soil. The logs and sticks decompose over years, providing excellent fertilizer, and they also retain lots of water so you don't need to irrigate much. Apparently if they start 7 feet tall you never have to water, but I made one 3 feet tall, and that's supposed to be able to go 2-3 weeks without watering. The first year they aren't as good at water retention, but they do much better in year 2 and on. Apparently they work for about 20 years before you need to start over.
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#19 bigdaddyale

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 06:25 PM

https://www.appropedia.org/Hugelkultur
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#20 DuncanDad

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Posted 06 October 2012 - 06:59 PM

Looking at the work that goes into that, I think I would go ahead and make them three feet high so I would not have to bend over to work in it.

I have some friends that have raised beds that you don't have to lean over to work.The beds are 5 cinderblocks deep. They plant tomatoes and everything else at chest height. Now, that's a bunch of work,
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