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Hop Substitution: Aroma For Bittering


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#1 zymot

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Posted 25 February 2022 - 08:53 PM

I got confused. I ordered Hallertau Blanc hops. I intended to use them for 60 minute bittering in this weekends Alt Beer.

9.1% AA
5.0% Beta Acid
22%-26% Cohumulone

They have Rots as cascade. Cascade is fine for bittering.

After I got them, I looked them up. Just about everything I read about Hallertau Blanc hops says they are "aroma" hops.

Now I can understand a hop might be a good bittering hop and no so wonderful for aroma. But I expect an aroma hop with enough AA would be OK to use for bittering.

If I use these Hallertau Blanc for 60 minute boils, what am I at risk for if I use them this way.

#2 postSingularityHumanoid

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Posted 26 February 2022 - 04:59 AM

in general I would think it would be fine to use them for bittering as long as you aren't going for an IBU that is so high that you have to use a ton of them.



#3 HVB

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Posted 26 February 2022 - 02:05 PM

I have done a few all Blanc Pilsners with no issues. That included Blanc used at 30 (my boil start),10 & whirlpool.

#4 denny

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Posted 27 February 2022 - 12:31 PM

There is no such thing as "aroma hops" or "bittering hops". Any hop can be used in any way that you like.  For instance, Chinook is typically looked at as a bittering hop, but it has wonderful qualities when used late in the boil or even as a dry hop.



#5 postSingularityHumanoid

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Posted 27 February 2022 - 03:17 PM

There is no such thing as "aroma hops" or "bittering hops". Any hop can be used in any way that you like.  For instance, Chinook is typically looked at as a bittering hop, but it has wonderful qualities when used late in the boil or even as a dry hop.

 

I think it's mostly a label based on if they are on the higher AA side or not and if they have desirable flavor/aroma qualities.  I've always viewed chinook as a dual purpose hop for sure.



#6 zymot

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Posted 28 February 2022 - 04:37 AM

Thanks guys for confirming what I understood. There might be some hops that are better suited for one use against another.

The classic example is magnum. As a hop to bitter your beer, this guy can do the heavy lifting. It has some noble aromatic characteristics, but I am pretty sure you would be wise to find a different hop to smell up your beer.

#7 HVB

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Posted 28 February 2022 - 05:16 AM

There is no such thing as "aroma hops" or "bittering hops". Any hop can be used in any way that you like.  For instance, Chinook is typically looked at as a bittering hop, but it has wonderful qualities when used late in the boil or even as a dry hop.

While I agree I think there are some hops that do much better at certain times.  Like NZ hops can get a weird taste if used to early in the boil.  At least to my tastes and my experience.  Spot on with chinook though.  I love, LOVE, chinook late in a boil or for dry hopping.  



#8 zymot

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Posted 28 February 2022 - 12:20 PM

Useful hop link.

https://beermaverick...omparison-tool/


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