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#21 HVB

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 07:21 AM

Any near you?

 

https://www.nemba.or...s/new-hampshire


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#22 Mando

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 07:28 AM

 

yeah - that's the website I found as well.  unfortunate name that made me think nambla.

 

some are right around me but I'm not sure of the actual difficulty level.  I should really check them out.


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#23 porter

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 07:53 AM

No idea what part of NH you're in but here's a screenshot from the Trailforks app. In the app, there are pictures of most trails so you can see what they're like.

Screenshot-20200605-085052-Trailforks.jp
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#24 neddles

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 08:19 AM

No idea what part of NH you're in but here's a screenshot from the Trailforks app. In the app, there are pictures of most trails so you can see what they're like.


Screenshot-20200605-085052-Trailforks.jp


Yeah that looks great.
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#25 Mando

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 08:29 AM

Similar content as the website but available offline which is nice. Cool app!

Edited by Mando, 05 June 2020 - 08:29 AM.

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#26 porter

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 08:33 AM

I use it all the time for route finding. I think it can also record your rides if you are interested in tracking your progress on routes, but I use Strava for that and haven't tried it. I also think it's cool that they're trying to cover hiking, Nordic skiing, etc. but can't speak to how comprehensive the maps are for that. They have pretty much everything covered in my area for mtb.
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#27 Mando

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Posted 07 June 2020 - 05:52 AM

I use it all the time for route finding. I think it can also record your rides if you are interested in tracking your progress on routes, but I use Strava for that and haven't tried it. I also think it's cool that they're trying to cover hiking, Nordic skiing, etc. but can't speak to how comprehensive the maps are for that. They have pretty much everything covered in my area for mtb.


Not a lot of users around here it seems. No trail condition reports lately.
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#28 Patrick C.

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Posted 07 June 2020 - 07:43 PM

MTB Project is another one that lets you download the maps, and see where you are on the trail.  

 

https://www.mtbproje...0/new-hampshire

 

Looks like they have mostly the same trails and the same lack of comments.  If you can't find any local recommendations, pick a trail system near you and go check it out by yourself.  Short of finding a local who has taken kids riding, that will be the best way to find a trail that is a good fit for your kids.

 

I built up a small frame 27.5" bike for my son three years ago when he was about 58" tall (4'10") and 11 years old.  It was a little too big for him and I had to cut down the seat post to get it to the right height, but he had no problem riding it and quickly grew in to it.  It was much lighter weight and had much better components than any kids bike I could have gotten him, so it was easier for him to ride and the shifters and brakes worked much better.  It's about the right size for him now at 14.  I may need to get a new frame and swap everything in a couple more years, or I might get away with just getting a longer stem.   

 

Sounds like your kid is a few inches shorter, but my guess is that the small frame will be just right and then too small before you know it.  


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#29 Mando

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 04:59 AM

I need to learn how to do some basic stuff like adjusting the brakes and derailers and everything. I've just never taken the time to figure it out. I noticed yesterday his rear brake engages a lot later than his front.
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#30 Mando

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 05:31 AM

Seems like I just loosen where the cable is attached, pull more through and tighten?
We did a short ride yesterday and then went to check out another place but the parking lot was packed so we bailed.
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#31 Patrick C.

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 05:59 AM

To take slack out of the brake cable, that's pretty much it.  There may be 'pre-load' adjustments that you use for fine adjustment as well.  Park Tool has a lot of good videos and instruction pages on different topics.  It's meant to sell their tools, but a lot of important stuff can be done with screwdrivers and allen wrenches.

 

https://www.parktool...help/?area[]=48


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#32 Mando

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 09:38 AM

I tightened up the slack to the point where the brakes are nearly engaged but it still takes a while for the brakes to really engage and bottom out.  any more and the pads would be permanently rubbing (at least a little).  not sure what is going on here.


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#33 Sidney Porter

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 12:26 PM

Depends on the types of brakes. Disc, cantilever, v, caliper, center pull all have different techniques to adjust.

Bicycling magazine has a series of books of bicycle repair and maintenance. They have seperate ones for road and mountain bikes. There are other publishers that do the same thing.
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#34 Mando

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 12:38 PM

Depends on the types of brakes. Disc, cantilever, v, caliper, center pull all have different techniques to adjust.

Bicycling magazine has a series of books of bicycle repair and maintenance. They have seperate ones for road and mountain bikes. There are other publishers that do the same thing.

 

these are disc brakes.  one side is fixed (probably how most of them are) and the other side is actuated by the cable pulling on it.


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#35 Sidney Porter

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 04:12 PM

You are correct most mechanical disc have a fixed and adjustabke pad. Did you adjust the pad that moves position? As the pad wears down you need to adjust to to be closer to the router. The adjustment is made there, not really with the cable.

If he has been wearing out his back tire he might have worn down the pad. If it has never been adjusted it would have a large gap. Also encourage front wheel braking but with body position over the seat. Braking and handling is better. The exception is going down some steep hills where there is a chance of getting your weight too far in front and flipping.

This is a pretty good instruction. It is for Shimano but pretty much the same for avids and sram

https://www.montague...al-disc-brakes/

Edited by Sidney Porter, 08 June 2020 - 04:17 PM.

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#36 Mando

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 05:23 PM

I thought the gap on the fixed pad looked reasonable but maybe I could snug it up a little :cheers:
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#37 Patrick C.

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Posted 08 June 2020 - 08:21 PM

Doh! Guess I should have clicked the link :) 

 

Never worked with mechanical discs, but it ain't rocket surgery.  Hydraulic disc brakes are amazing, but I imagine you can get the mechs adjusted to where he can stay in control. 


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#38 Mando

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 06:02 AM

MTB Project is another one that lets you download the maps, and see where you are on the trail.

https://www.mtbproje...0/new-hampshire

Looks like they have mostly the same trails and the same lack of comments. If you can't find any local recommendations, pick a trail system near you and go check it out by yourself. Short of finding a local who has taken kids riding, that will be the best way to find a trail that is a good fit for your kids.

I built up a small frame 27.5" bike for my son three years ago when he was about 58" tall (4'10") and 11 years old. It was a little too big for him and I had to cut down the seat post to get it to the right height, but he had no problem riding it and quickly grew in to it. It was much lighter weight and had much better components than any kids bike I could have gotten him, so it was easier for him to ride and the shifters and brakes worked much better. It's about the right size for him now at 14. I may need to get a new frame and swap everything in a couple more years, or I might get away with just getting a longer stem.

Sounds like your kid is a few inches shorter, but my guess is that the small frame will be just right and then too small before you know it.

Yeah, my son is about 55" right now. He just turned 10. Average height for his age which surprises me since both of his parents are above average height. Anyway yeah, 27.5" might be a little big for him. And yes, hell grow out of 26" before I know it lol. Only saving grace is that his sister inherits his old bikes for at least a couple of years. She's three years younger but 99th percentile in height.

Edited by Mando, 09 June 2020 - 06:03 AM.

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#39 Mando

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 06:24 AM

So what's up with the sizing? I see there are bikes with 27.5" tires. Even my bike only had 26 with a 19.5" frame. Have the wheels/tires just gotten bigger over the years?
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#40 Sidney Porter

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Posted 09 June 2020 - 06:34 AM

Yes, the was a shift to change the standard mtb size from 26 to 29. Then they introduced 27.5. there are justifiable pros and cons of each size but I am somewhat of the opinion that 26 was fine for 99%. But introducing a new standard drove some purchases.

With adult bikes frame size is more important than tire size
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