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#1 Mando

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 02:57 PM

My son currently has this bike:

 

https://www.cannonda...sku=c51268m10os

 

sweet ride in my opinion.  anyway he's just about the destroyed the back tire as boys do.

 

at some point I'll have to replace it when his sister inherits it.

 

the tire size is 24 x 1.95.  do I need a tire of this exact size or would 24 x something close to 1.95 be fine?


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#2 Sidney Porter

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 03:18 PM

It will be fine to go a little wider or narrower
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#3 neddles

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 03:51 PM

It will be fine to go a little wider or narrower

 

...as long as it fits within the frame. Some builds don't allow much extra clearance for wide tires.


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#4 Mando

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 03:56 PM

I'll check how much clearance there is


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#5 Sidney Porter

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 04:18 PM

...as long as it fits within the frame. Some builds don't allow much extra clearance for wide tires.

which is why I said a little. 1.8 to 2.1 should be fine. Which is what you will find at target, Wal Mart etc. Bell, Schwinn brand. I made the assumption he was going basic and not looking to make it a fat bike

Edited by Sidney Porter, 03 June 2020 - 04:19 PM.

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#6 Mando

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 05:32 PM

I was thinking pink tires would go a long way in making my daughter cool with that bike.
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#7 Sidney Porter

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Posted 03 June 2020 - 05:39 PM

I was thinking pink tires would go a long way in making my daughter cool with that bike.

take her on some basic mountain bike trails and she will be cool with it
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#8 BlKtRe

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 05:51 AM

...as long as it fits within the frame. Some builds don't allow much extra clearance for wide tires.


Edited by BlKtRe, 04 June 2020 - 05:52 AM.

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#9 Mando

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 12:45 PM

finding tires online is harder than I would have expected.

 

also - how hard is it to take the back wheel off the frame without taking too much apart?  I've never had to do it before - front wheel only.


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#10 porter

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 01:19 PM

I can't tell for sure from that picture but that bike should have quick release skewers on the opposite side from the rear cassette (gears), in which case it will take about 30 seconds: turn the quick release lever 180 degrees to loosen, hold the opposite side of the skewer steady and unscrew CCW using the lever 6-12 turns until loose, then gently lift the rear wheel away from the frame and pull the chain off the cassette.
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#11 neddles

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 01:21 PM

finding tires online is harder than I would have expected.

 

also - how hard is it to take the back wheel off the frame without taking too much apart?  I've never had to do it before - front wheel only.

 

Not hard at all but might seem tricky the first time you do it. Having the biked clamped in a work stand is infinitely easier. Nothing needs to come apart just undo the quick release and extend the derailleur so you have room to get the axle out from inside the loop of the chain. And be careful of the disk portion of the brake, not to torque it or touch it.


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#12 neddles

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 01:46 PM

I remember you starting a thread a while back about sports for kids. If your kid(s) like biking, definitely look to see if you have a mountain team there in NH. Great underrated kids sport.
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#13 Mando

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Posted 04 June 2020 - 01:47 PM

I remember you starting a thread a while back about sports for kids. If your kid(s) like biking, definitely look to see if you have a mountain team there in NH. Great underrated kids sport.

 

they like it now at the very least b/c there isn't much else to do outside :P

 

they also have some cheap rollerskates b/c why not?  my son is also skateboarding very poorly but probably about on par for level of experience.


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#14 Mando

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 04:29 AM

so there are some trails that are near by that we could try out.  I'd say my son (the older of the two children) could maybe handle them.  most of the trails around me are either intermediate or intermediate/difficult.  I don't really have a baseline for what that means since I haven't been on these trails before.

 

from my memories of riding in the woods as a kid there aren't many easy trails so maybe this is accurate.  NH is a very rocky/rooty place so this makes riding on the trails hard at times.  more so for smaller people with smaller wheels.  I remember occasionally discovering some trails in pine forests where the ground was actually smooth and covered with pine needles.  traction was not great but the smoothness of the trail was like a vacation for your body and going faster was a lot easier to do safely.

 

I was never a very impressive mountain biker.  I still have my trek 830 (no suspension!) from circa 1994.  All I've ever changed on it were the brake pads.  this bike would almost certainly not be safe to push really hard.  cruising around the neighborhood just about anything works which is why I haven't done anything with/about it yet.


Edited by Mando, 05 June 2020 - 04:33 AM.

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#15 Mando

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 04:37 AM

yesterday we let me daughter ride my son's bike with the seat lowered.  she seemed to really like having gears.  her current bike is a good quality bike (specialized hot rock) but it only has one gear, one hand brake and the foot brakes (she doesn't seem to use them, wish I had bought the version of that bike with just hand brakes back when it was my son's.  in any event she'll be moving onto the cannondale soon enough it seems.  my son has the seat as high as it will go right now.  these kids don't know how good they've got it!  I was cruising around on huffy's until my dad bought me the trek 830 that I'm still using to this day.


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#16 neddles

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 06:20 AM

Talk to a local shop to find out where there are some novice trails. There has to be some good places to get a kid started. If you haven’t been riding I suspect you’ll find there are more trails around than you know about. Also, a lot recent trail building has focused less on the rocky technical and narrow single track that a lot of us grew up on. A lot of the newer stuff tends be smoother, faster and flow much better.

There’s a shortage of bikes right now, worldwide I am told. I was also told many companies are trying to get production started on next years bikes right now. If your considering a new bike for the older kid start calling around now.

If your 830 is in good working order you’ll be fine. Tune it up or have it tuned, if necessary. Several of my riding friends had 830s. That bike was heavy but durable.
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#17 porter

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 06:22 AM

There's an app called Trailforks that is great for locating trails and rating difficulty by green/blue/black. Started for mountain biking but they're expanding to hiking and other sports. Free.
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#18 Mando

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 06:48 AM

####ing covid19....

What's the recommended next size after 24?
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#19 neddles

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 06:49 AM

26, I believe. Depending on his size/growth you might be able to justify going bigger.
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#20 Mando

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Posted 05 June 2020 - 06:56 AM

right now he's about 55" tall.  pretty much average for his age.  in 3 years he'll be about 5' 1" (maybe 5' 2") if he stays on the same line.

 

the charts I see seem to stop at 24" (for whatever reason kids bikes are just sized by the wheel I guess).

 

it looks like his next bike would be an extra small adult frame.

 

https://www.bicyclin...ight-bike-size/


Edited by Mando, 05 June 2020 - 07:01 AM.

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