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Who knows about link aggregation on a router?

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#1 toonces

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Posted 22 May 2020 - 03:32 PM

How does one accomplish such magic?


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#2 Beejus McReejus

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Posted Yesterday, 05:48 AM

What are you trying to accomplish? Multiple connections from ISPs, redundant uplink connections, or increasing bandwidth for a trunk?

What kind of hardware are we talking about?

Edited by Beejus McReejus, Yesterday, 05:49 AM.

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#3 TxBrewer

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Posted Yesterday, 05:51 AM

As long as your router and the switch support LAG it isn't difficult. Usually set the aggregate ports on both sides using the same protocol and then they are good.

Edited by TxBrewer, Yesterday, 05:52 AM.

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#4 strangebrewer

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Posted Yesterday, 06:22 AM

Why? As Beejus said its hardware specific and usually not worth the headache.

#5 toonces

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Posted Yesterday, 08:28 AM

Specifically, it's a Netgear Nighthawk X10.  Except the one they sent me is defective, it doesn't broadcast WiFi (the current router is seemingly on its end of life, the hardware can't keep up with network upgrades).  So a replacement is enroute.  The LAG was actually an afterthought when the X10 arrived.  Eventually, I want to build a screaming gamer machine for DCS and other like games (currently have a cheapo i3 with wireless capacity for the biz).  The house is CAT-5 wired, but only the kitchen and living room have more than one RJ-45 port.  So, I thought I'd place this new router in my office and hook the two LAG ports to the future machine.  Since the only other person who would need access to this router strictly uses WiFi, this wouldn't be a problem.

So, is LAG strictly for large file transfers?  Or, would it be useful in gaming scenarios?  And what hardware is needed on the machine side?  


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#6 Stains_not_here_man

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Posted Yesterday, 09:35 AM

Unnecessary. The bottleneck in a scenario like this will be the link from your router to the ISP and not the internal network. Link aggregation would be used in a scenario where you had 2 ISPs, like DSL and cable modem and you wanted to use them both as a single pipe. Using two CAT5 ports in your house as a single pipe won't be any faster than one (and could be slower due to overhead).
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#7 badogg

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Posted Yesterday, 09:49 AM

Specifically, it's a Netgear Nighthawk X10. Except the one they sent me is defective, it doesn't broadcast WiFi (the current router is seemingly on its end of life, the hardware can't keep up with network upgrades). So a replacement is enroute. The LAG was actually an afterthought when the X10 arrived. Eventually, I want to build a screaming gamer machine for DCS and other like games (currently have a cheapo i3 with wireless capacity for the biz). The house is CAT-5 wired, but only the kitchen and living room have more than one RJ-45 port. So, I thought I'd place this new router in my office and hook the two LAG ports to the future machine. Since the only other person who would need access to this router strictly uses WiFi, this wouldn't be a problem.

So, is LAG strictly for large file transfers? Or, would it be useful in gaming scenarios? And what hardware is needed on the machine side?


I have dcs, but damn i have no idea what I'm doing. Lol
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#8 toonces

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Posted Yesterday, 10:36 AM

Unnecessary. The bottleneck in a scenario like this will be the link from your router to the ISP and not the internal network. Link aggregation would be used in a scenario where you had 2 ISPs, like DSL and cable modem and you wanted to use them both as a single pipe. Using two CAT5 ports in your house as a single pipe won't be any faster than one (and could be slower due to overhead).

 

Um.  This router has two Gigabit RJ45 ports specifically designated for LAG.  How does one have two ISP into the same router?


I have dcs, but damn i have no idea what I'm doing. Lol

 

Me, neither.  Especially on a machine barely capable of keeping up.


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#9 djinkc

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Posted Yesterday, 10:56 AM

.............Me, neither.  Especially on a machine barely capable of keeping up.

Don't be so hard on yourself


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#10 Vagus

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Posted Yesterday, 11:01 AM

sofaking hardon


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#11 Stains_not_here_man

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Posted Yesterday, 12:07 PM

Um. This router has two Gigabit RJ45 ports specifically designated for LAG. How does one have two ISP into the same router?


By paying for it?

In computer networking, the term link aggregation refers to various methods of combining (aggregating) multiple network connections in parallel in order to increase throughput beyond what a single connection could sustain, and to provide redundancy in case one of the links should fail.


See the bold. What I'm saying is that even a single cat5 cable directly from your ISP to the computer can already handle more than your ISP can sustain. You can't get more speed by adding more pipes from your router to your computer because your ISP is not able to overwhelm even a single pipe. Link aggregation has no benefit in your situation unless you have 2 separate 1gbit incoming links.
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#12 toonces

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Posted Yesterday, 01:00 PM

Don't be so hard on yourself

 

I said keeping up.  Not keeping it up.


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#13 Vagus

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Posted Yesterday, 03:41 PM

If it goes longer than four hours, is it weird to request a female doc?
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#14 toonces

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Posted Yesterday, 03:52 PM

If it goes longer than four hours, is it weird to request a female doc?

 

No.  But, stay off of the Viagra.


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#15 Vagus

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Posted Yesterday, 04:12 PM

No. But, stay off of the Viagra.


Can't bro, old is the new young
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#16 Beejus McReejus

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Posted Today, 06:15 AM

The only times I've configured ports like this is for trunking to a core switch. So you have multiple user access switches (hundreds of ports on each), connecting back to a core switch over bonded 10G trunks. So each leg going back to the core is a 20G or 40G trunk.

I agree that in a home network scenario, you're probably not exceeding the capacity of the of a single port. Your connection to the ISP is going to be the bottleneck.

But still fun to play around with. :)
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