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Bluing metal

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#1 dagomike

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 06:11 AM

(insert Tobias Funke and Zoolander references)

 

Anyone blue steel? It seems pretty straight forward on the YouTubes. Wondering if anyone have any tips/tricks and suggested products.

 

I'm restoring my grandpa's .22 rifle and want to retreat the steel. 


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#2 Vagus

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 06:12 AM

In before blue steel
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#3 Genesee Ted

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 10:58 AM

In before Steel Reserve

#4 strangebrewer

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 11:15 AM

Thats a great way of giving your rifle a new start.

#5 strangebrewer

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 01:32 PM

Ok I'll provide something valuable as I went down this path myself a couple years ago. Did a bunch of research, talked to people, and came to the conclusion that I was only going to do this one time so the setup and dealing with the chemicals was a decent amount of work for a single use.

I checked around and found a local trade school with a gunsmithing program that also operated a repair facility. They already had everything needed and even the students there had more expertise than I. $50 later I got back a cleaned and perfectly blue'd .22 . I like to build things much like yourself but in this case I thought it wasn't worth everything required to be able to achieve an acceptable result.

#6 texred1

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 01:50 PM

What strangebrewer said....

 

I would also add that unless there is more than sentimental value, then I would look into having it cerakoted. I think cerakote is a better finish in the long run for durability, but not everybody likes that look.

 

~dustin


Edited by texred1, 27 February 2020 - 01:52 PM.

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#7 dagomike

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 02:25 PM

According to the youtubes, basically you clean it down, apply this blue stuff, then hit it with steel wool/abrasive. Repeat. Then oil like normal.

 

Has the tubes misled me?

 

I've got it down to bare metal and ready to go. Or at least close. I need to do the middle 1/4 of the barrel because I couldn't soak it all. I'm planning to make a wooden container to soak it all at once. need to clean out the barrel, but waiting for a new cleaning rope. 

 

Then, I have to decide what I'm doing with the wood. Refinish, or try to clean it as best I can and leave the patina. 

 

It's basically sentimental. It's nearly 100 years old and I would like to restore it back to what it was within reason.


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#8 BrewerGeorge

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 02:32 PM

Wallpaper tray.



#9 mTizzle

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 02:39 PM

According to the youtubes, basically you clean it down, apply this blue stuff, then hit it with steel wool/abrasive. Repeat. Then oil like normal.

Has the tubes misled me?

I've got it down to bare metal and ready to go. Or at least close. I need to do the middle 1/4 of the barrel because I couldn't soak it all. I'm planning to make a wooden container to soak it all at once. need to clean out the barrel, but waiting for a new cleaning rope.

Then, I have to decide what I'm doing with the wood. Refinish, or try to clean it as best I can and leave the patina.

It's basically sentimental. It's nearly 100 years old and I would like to restore it back to what it was within reason.

I think there is blueing in a bottle and how the gun is blued at the factory. But I could be wrong.

I did a pistol with the stuff from the bottle once (many years ago). But mostly to touch up after removing minimal surface rust in some small spots. Seemed to work well per your procedure.

I have a shotgun with a Some surface rust that I am getting ready to do this to as well.

Edited by mTizzle, 27 February 2020 - 02:39 PM.

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#10 StankDelicious

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 02:45 PM

Cold bluing is the blue in a bottle. What he wants is hot bluing.


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#11 Dave

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 02:59 PM

 What he wants is hawt bluing.


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#12 dagomike

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 03:18 PM

Wallpaper tray.

Looked for they, but could find one at Home Depot. Wondering if wallpaper is just not a thing anymore.
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#13 miccullen

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 03:46 PM

Ok I'll provide something valuable as I went down this path myself a couple years ago. Did a bunch of research, talked to people, and came to the conclusion that I was only going to do this one time so the setup and dealing with the chemicals was a decent amount of work for a single use.

I checked around and found a local trade school with a gunsmithing program that also operated a repair facility. They already had everything needed and even the students there had more expertise than I. $50 later I got back a cleaned and perfectly blue'd .22 . I like to build things much like yourself but in this case I thought it wasn't worth everything required to be able to achieve an acceptable result.

Colorado School of Trades? at one time they were the best gunsmith school in the US


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#14 DieselGopher

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 03:54 PM

What he wants is hawt blewing.


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#15 miccullen

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 03:58 PM

hot bluing is best left to pros really

 

 

you might investigate rust bluing, it's tedious but very pretty if done right, another finish to consider is browning


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#16 dagomike

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 04:17 PM

Hmm so cold blue or just oil it and call it done?
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#17 strangebrewer

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 06:43 PM

Colorado School of Trades? at one time they were the best gunsmith school in the US


That's the one!

#18 miccullen

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Posted 27 February 2020 - 10:17 PM

Hmm so cold blue or just oil it and call i

I might give this one a try https://www.brownell...8795-21472.aspx


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#19 BrewerGeorge

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Posted 28 February 2020 - 06:11 AM

You can also ask around your neighborhood and find somebody to Cerakoat it for you.  You can also buy a kit to do it yourself, but if there is a guy near you set up to do it, it's often cheap enough to just let them do it.  I think I paid $35 to have the slide on my CM9 blackened.



#20 davelew

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Posted 28 February 2020 - 07:22 AM

Cold bluing is the blue in a bottle. What he wants is hot bluing.

 

Depends if there are any welds or soldered/brazed joints.  I don't know much about 100 year old .22 rifles, but there are situations where the cold process is better (I'm not a gun guy, but I have worked with plenty of black oxide finishes on steel parts, which is the same process as bluing).  The hot process will give slightly more even appearance in my experience, but not enough better to justify issues with any other metals attached to the steel.


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