Jump to content


Photo

Mah Neighbor - cattle grazing query


  • Please log in to reply
48 replies to this topic

#1 Buzz Buzzard

Buzz Buzzard

    Comptroller of Fanatical Political Expressionism

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts
  • LocationHere, not there.

Posted 15 May 2019 - 10:24 AM

My neighbor is a John Deere dealer.

Has a nice compound across the road from me.

Really quite beautiful.

He has a few cattle that graze in the pasture next to my land.

He came over to talk the other day.

"let me help you out. I will put a gate in between our land (my fence) and graze my cattle on it, it will keep the pastures clean"

 

Well he is right there, they would not have to be mowed.

But I just don't think there is any significant advantage to me. 

He'd probably share a little beef with me for it, but I don't need the meat.

I'd have liability issues, potential damage to the land from the cattle running the hillside bare etc..

My pilot neighbor is a big time farmer says it is not a bad idea and he'd let him do it.

 

I've got the place looking really nice now.  The pastures are starting to approach looking like lawns. (mostly)

We are going to start construction on the new house this summer.  I just can't see it.

 

Am I just being stupid?  (moar than normal)


Edited by Buzz Buzzard, 15 May 2019 - 10:27 AM.

  • 0

#2 Dave

Dave

    Grammaraticus of Titty Money

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 29237 posts
  • LocationLugnar Island

Posted 15 May 2019 - 10:27 AM

You can corner the cow patty market!
  • 0

#3 Buzz Buzzard

Buzz Buzzard

    Comptroller of Fanatical Political Expressionism

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts
  • LocationHere, not there.

Posted 15 May 2019 - 10:30 AM

Free fartilzer


  • 0

#4 texred1

texred1

    Permanent Comptroller & Pyromaniac

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3360 posts
  • LocationDallas, TX

Posted 15 May 2019 - 10:43 AM

I would look into how much it is to lease land for cattle. Then charge appropriately. He is getting way more benefit than you are.

 

~dustin


  • 0

#5 SnowMan

SnowMan

    Advanced Snowman

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7199 posts
  • LocationSunman, IN

Posted 15 May 2019 - 10:44 AM

I'd say it depends on your timing.  With starting the house this summer, I wouldn't do it. They aren't going to destroy anything as long as you don't graze them in a drought, but they might wear some favored spots bare. 

 

If you do decide to do it.  It's worth $ to you... Prices are highly local, so you might want to ask around at the feed mill or farm store what going rates are in your area.

 

Southern Indiana, it's something like $1 per head per day and the owner of the cattle provides everything else.  Minerals, Medication, supplemental forage, supplemental water, hauling, etc. Fence maintenance varies.  Some landowners will maintain the fence for a set fee per month above the cattle fee, think a couple hundred dollars a month.  Others will put it on the owner of the cattle to do and make him keep it to a certain standard. 

 

In either case, if you decide to let him use it for free, or work out a lease, you should plan on carrying a farm liability insurance policy.  It isn't expensive, and will protect you against an unforeseen liability caused by someone else's farming activities. 


  • 0

#6 DuncanDad

DuncanDad

    Comptroller of Complaints and Unruly Clients

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 15439 posts
  • LocationLaGrange, GA

Posted 15 May 2019 - 10:52 AM

No, "Get off my lawn"?

Dang!  You guys a slipping.


  • 0

#7 Ford Maddox

Ford Maddox

    Comptroller of King Richard V

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 31567 posts
  • LocationThe Galaxy

Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:15 AM

You can corner the cow patty market!


Oh magic mushroom farms

Edited by Blackula, 15 May 2019 - 11:16 AM.

  • 0

#8 Deerslyr

Deerslyr

    Disliker of Nut Kicking

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 22812 posts
  • LocationGod's Country!

Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:24 AM

Yeah... don't do a gentleman's agreement.  Ask around about what is market to expect from both sides and get a lease.  Your insurance company may want to know.  Any streams running through the land to be concerned with from an environmental perspective?

Your gonna hate this, but I'm gonna say you should consult with a lawyer to paper it.  

 

Oh... and try to at least get at tenderloin out of it (in addition to the rental fee).


  • 0

#9 neddles

neddles

    No Life

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 11954 posts

Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:33 AM

I'd say it depends on your timing.  With starting the house this summer, I wouldn't do it. They aren't going to destroy anything as long as you don't graze them in a drought, but they might wear some favored spots bare. 

 

If you do decide to do it.  It's worth $ to you... Prices are highly local, so you might want to ask around at the feed mill or farm store what going rates are in your area.

 

Southern Indiana, it's something like $1 per head per day and the owner of the cattle provides everything else.  Minerals, Medication, supplemental forage, supplemental water, hauling, etc. Fence maintenance varies.  Some landowners will maintain the fence for a set fee per month above the cattle fee, think a couple hundred dollars a month.  Others will put it on the owner of the cattle to do and make him keep it to a certain standard. 

 

In either case, if you decide to let him use it for free, or work out a lease, you should plan on carrying a farm liability insurance policy.  It isn't expensive, and will protect you against an unforeseen liability caused by someone else's farming activities. 

 

 

Yeah... don't do a gentleman's agreement.  Ask around about what is market to expect from both sides and get a lease.  Your insurance company may want to know.  Any streams running through the land to be concerned with from an environmental perspective?

Your gonna hate this, but I'm gonna say you should consult with a lawyer to paper it.  

 

Oh... and try to at least get at tenderloin out of it (in addition to the rental fee).

 

the tl;dr... No.

 

Enjoy the simplicity of your own land and privacy. 


  • 0

#10 Buzz Buzzard

Buzz Buzzard

    Comptroller of Fanatical Political Expressionism

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts
  • LocationHere, not there.

Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:38 AM

This is where I am.
  • 0

#11 Kellermeister

Kellermeister

    Comptroller of Grievances

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5208 posts
  • Locationthese are not the droids you are looking for

Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:43 AM

If you don't mow or brush hog your land it will get overgrown with bushes and trees.
  • 0

#12 Buzz Buzzard

Buzz Buzzard

    Comptroller of Fanatical Political Expressionism

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts
  • LocationHere, not there.

Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:50 AM

I come up here every few weeks to do it.
  • 0

#13 Kellermeister

Kellermeister

    Comptroller of Grievances

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5208 posts
  • Locationthese are not the droids you are looking for

Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:52 AM

I forgot to add, if the cattle graze it, you won't have to mow as much.
  • 0

#14 TxBrewer

TxBrewer

    CrAp Czar

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 18765 posts

Posted 15 May 2019 - 11:54 AM

Check with your insurance provider to see if you need a large animal rider (maybe the wrong wording) we had one for horses and now for the cow in case they get out.

Don't know if it will bother you but after a rain they will tear things up a bit moving around. I use a zero turn and mowing the field the cow is in shakes the heck outta me.
  • 0

#15 MakeMeHoppy

MakeMeHoppy

    Redundancy Comptroller of Redundancy

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 8035 posts
  • LocationLower, Slower Delaware

Posted 15 May 2019 - 12:44 PM

maybe consider letting him use part of the land and see how it goes?


  • 0

#16 Mexas Joe

Mexas Joe

    Obama Thanker

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 20250 posts
  • LocationIt's OK to be White

Posted 15 May 2019 - 12:57 PM

Ag exemption on taxes?
  • 0

#17 Buzz Buzzard

Buzz Buzzard

    Comptroller of Fanatical Political Expressionism

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 10063 posts
  • LocationHere, not there.

Posted 15 May 2019 - 01:11 PM

My tax bill is 700ish a year.
There's a swale running down both our properties, his is below mine.
The cattle keep it a muddy ugly mess.
The more I think about it the more convinced no is the answer.

I'll live here soon and this perfect vista will be far easier to maintain.
Thanks for the input all.
  • 0

#18 BlKtRe

BlKtRe

    Comptroller of le Shartes

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14539 posts
  • LocationThe Land of Oz

Posted 15 May 2019 - 01:56 PM

If it was me and it's good grass as you described, I'd lease it as hay ground. The farmer fertilizes, cuts, bails all of it except you get a nice fee and some pretty land that's been taken care of properly.

Edited by BlKtRe, 15 May 2019 - 01:57 PM.

  • 0

#19 SnowMan

SnowMan

    Advanced Snowman

  • Patron
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7199 posts
  • LocationSunman, IN

Posted 15 May 2019 - 02:03 PM

If it was me and it's good grass as you described, I'd lease it as hay ground. The farmer fertilizes, cuts, bails all of it except you get a nice fee and some pretty land that's been taken care of properly.

 

 

Good luck getting a lease worth anything on hay ground.  You can generally lease ground for crops of the farmers choice, corn, wheat, soy, etc.  Or you can do hay and most will do halfsies give or take depending on the quality of the hay. 

 

I had 12 acres in hay at my current place.  I'd get about 60 bales a year in a good year.  $25/bale for just plain old grass hay.  I'd actually get 1/2 that $ as the farmer kept 50% of the hay as his fee for doing the work.  I sold my share to him for the $25/bale. 

 

He pays $150/ acre for crops, so that's the better route to maximize $


  • 0

#20 TxBrewer

TxBrewer

    CrAp Czar

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 18765 posts

Posted 15 May 2019 - 02:39 PM

If it was me and it's good grass as you described, I'd lease it as hay ground. The farmer fertilizes, cuts, bails all of it except you get a nice fee and some pretty land that's been taken care of properly.

 

around here it is tough to find someone willing to mess with anything under 10-15 acres even if you work a split instead of payment.


  • 0


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users