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Tropical Stout


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#1 Buscotucky

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 05:36 AM

The local homebrew club & shop hosted a presentation from one of the Omega yeast guys about their Norwegian yeasts (kviek.) In conjunction with that, they announced a homebrew comp where you use one of the 3 yeasts (Hot Head, Voss, Hornidal) & the winner gets brewed at the local brewery.

 

While the NEIPA/IPA is probably going to be popular, I'm thinking of trying a Tropical Stout...the fruitiness of the yeast should be in line with the style, and I like a good malty dark beer to break up the IPA's.

 

Anybody brewed a good one they could share? Or thoughts in general on the style?

 

I've got a couple of months to put it together.


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#2 ER Pemberton

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 06:47 AM

I remember reading THIS awhile back... not because I was thinking of making it but because I wanted to know about the style.  Strangely (to me), stout is very popular in the Caribbean and I wondered if a Tropical Stout is their style.  Still not sure but this is supposed to be a good TS recipe.  Good luck Busco, we're all counting on you.  :D



#3 HVB

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 07:09 AM

I remember reading THIS awhile back... not because I was thinking of making it but because I wanted to know about the style.  Strangely (to me), stout is very popular in the Caribbean and I wondered if a Tropical Stout is their style.  Still not sure but this is supposed to be a good TS recipe.  Good luck Busco, we're all counting on you.  :D

 

I remember reading in Jamil's recipe book where it said that a Sweet Stout was a Caribbean thing.  Never made sense to me as I would want a light refreshing beer.


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#4 ER Pemberton

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 07:40 AM

I remember reading in Jamil's recipe book where it said that a Sweet Stout was a Caribbean thing.  Never made sense to me as I would want a light refreshing beer.

Exactly.  I don't think the recipe in my link is that type of beer but there are Caribbean islands that brew their own version of Guinness, Jamaica has Dragon Stout and there are some others.  I think the "Tropical" part of this comes from the fruitiness of the citrusy hops.   



#5 neddles

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 08:31 AM

It thought the tropical came from the fact there there was a particular derivation of stout that was exported to that geographic area back in the day.


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#6 HVB

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 08:39 AM

It thought the tropical came from the fact there there was a particular derivation of stout that was exported to that geographic area back in the day.

I got my names confused about.  It was not sweet stout but Foreign Extra Stout that was popular in the Caribbean.

 

http://dev.bjcp.org/...gn-extra-stout/

 

 

 

Originally high-gravity stouts brewed for tropical markets (and hence, sometimes known as “Tropical Stouts”). Some bottled export (i.e., stronger) versions of dry or sweet stout also fit this profile. Guinness Foreign Extra Stout has been made since the early 1800s.

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#7 Zsasz

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 04:38 PM

nothing I want more than a nice heavy beer in hot/humid weather :lol:


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#8 Bklmt2000

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Posted 05 March 2019 - 04:49 PM

A couple of thoughts out of left field:

 

IMO, a good FES/tropical stout should be essentially a bigger/stronger dry stout. 

 

That is, the same basic beer as, say, draught Guinness, but brewed to a higher gravity, and with an overall dry/medium-dry finish.

 

Not overly-heavy, cloying, or otherwise sweet, but dry, relative to the OG.  Main hop impact should be the bittering addition; some lighter late additions can be good, but shouldn't try to make the beer into a black IPA. 

 

Simple grist: 2-row, roasted barley, some flaked barley if desired, and that's about it. 

 

I don't think crystal/caramel malts belong in a FES/tropical stout; the body and any impressions of sweetness should come from the higher OG due to a high amount of 2-row barley.  Mash temp should be low/moderately-low (low 150's at most).


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#9 Zsasz

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 04:53 AM

I would def go the no Crystal route if it was me.
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#10 HVB

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 06:23 AM

I think even some MW would be good in there to help with the color but not make it over roasty.

 

Busco ... what are you thinking you want to use for hops?


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#11 Buscotucky

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 08:51 AM

Thanks for the feedback guys...

 

I was thinking traditional English hops, probably just for a bittering addition. Target maybe. 

 

From the bjcp (interesting - Foreign Export Stout has it's own category):

 

16C. Tropical Stout

Overall Impression: A very dark, sweet, fruity, moderately strong ale with smooth roasty flavors without a burnt harshness.

 

Aroma: Sweetness evident, moderate to high intensity. Roasted grain aromas moderate to high, and can have coffee or chocolate notes. Fruitiness medium to high. May have a molasses, licorice, dried fruit, and/or vinous aromatics. Stronger versions can have a subtle clean aroma of alcohol. Hop aroma low to none. Diacetyl low to none.

 

Appearance: Very deep brown to black in color. Clarity usually obscured by deep color (if not opaque, should be clear). Large tan to brown head with good retention

 

Flavor: Quite sweet with a smooth dark grain flavors, and restrained bitterness. Roasted grain and malt character can be moderate to high with a smooth coffee or chocolate flavor, although the roast character is moderated in the balance by the sweet finish. Moderate to high fruity esters. Can have a sweet, dark rum-like quality. Little to no hop flavor. Medium-low to no diacetyl.

 

Mouthfeel: Medium-full to full body, often with a smooth, creamy character. May give a warming (but never hot) impression from alcohol presence. Moderate to moderately-high carbonation.

 

Comments: Sweetness levels can vary significantly. Surprisingly refreshing in a hot climate.

 

History:Originally high-gravity stouts brewed for tropical markets, became popular and imitated by local brewers often using local sugars and ingredients.

 

Characteristic Ingredients:Similar to a sweet stout, but with more gravity. Pale and dark roasted malts and grains. Hops mostly for bitterness. May use adjuncts and sugar to boost gravity. Typically made with warm-fermented lager yeast.Style

 

Comparison: Tastes like a scaled-up sweet stout with higher fruitiness. Similar to some Imperial Stouts without the high bitterness, strong/burnt roastiness, and late hops, and with lower alcohol. Much more sweet and less hoppy than American Stouts. Much sweeter and less bitter than the similar-gravity Export Stouts.

 

Vital Statistics:  OG: 1.056 – 1.075     IBUs: 30 – 50     FG: 1.010 – 1.018     SRM: 30 – 40      ABV: 5.5 – 8.0%

 

Commercial Examples: ABC Extra Stout, Dragon Stout, Jamaica Stout, Lion Stout, Royal Extra Stout


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#12 ER Pemberton

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Posted 06 March 2019 - 09:09 AM

I remember watching one of my favorite shows (Three Sheets) and the host was in Jamaica.  He said he was going to check out the "FOUR Rs" of Jamaica... Rum, Red Stripe, Rastas and Reggae".  At the start of the show he's in some market stalls looking at souvenirs and a guy is holding a bottle.  The host says, "Hey, what are you drinking!?" and the guy holds it up and it's Guinness.  The host says something in the voiceover like "I wouldn't have expected that in Jamaica" and then he says to the guy, "Why do you guys drink so much Guinness?" and the islander says, "When you drink Guinness it's like you're smoking ganja" which the host admitted he didn't understand.  My take on it was that it was a strong version of Guinness and they just like the way it makes them feel.  Their Dragon Stout is known as a Tropical Stout and it's 7.5% so... pretty heavy.




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