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Iodophor...


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#1 ER Pemberton

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Posted 15 January 2019 - 08:00 PM

The guys on the low-O2 board mentioned using iodophor over Starsan.  I forget the specific reason but I think it had something to do with it having a wider range of sanitizing power.  I never, ever had an issue with Starsan but I did buy a bottle of iodophor.  With all the brewing I've done lately I ran out of Starsan and started using the iodophor with good results.  I always keep a bucket of sanitizer from the latest batch in case I need to do a quick sanitizing (flask, funnel, etc).  The iodophor solution I have in this bucket (from January 6) looks like it has lost most of its color and some articles online mention that iodophor solution doesn't last as long as Starsan.  I'm transferring a beer tomorrow and I'd like to sanitize some things so I'm thinking of just adding 2 caps full of iodophor to the existing water (2 caps is the suggested 5 gallon amount).  Anyone see an issue with that?

 

Ps.  Using (and smelling) iodophor reminds me of brewing when I was a newbie.  It's one of the more memorable smells from brewday.  



#2 Zsasz

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 05:33 AM

The guys on the low-O2 board mentioned using iodophor over Starsan.  I forget the specific reason but I think it had something to do with it having a wider range of sanitizing power.  I never, ever had an issue with Starsan but I did buy a bottle of iodophor.  With all the brewing I've done lately I ran out of Starsan and started using the iodophor with good results.  I always keep a bucket of sanitizer from the latest batch in case I need to do a quick sanitizing (flask, funnel, etc).  The iodophor solution I have in this bucket (from January 6) looks like it has lost most of its color and some articles online mention that iodophor solution doesn't last as long as Starsan.  I'm transferring a beer tomorrow and I'd like to sanitize some things so I'm thinking of just adding 2 caps full of iodophor to the existing water (2 caps is the suggested 5 gallon amount).  Anyone see an issue with that?

 

Ps.  Using (and smelling) iodophor reminds me of brewing when I was a newbie.  It's one of the more memorable smells from brewday.  

 

I'd just use new water but it's probably fine.


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#3 Poptop

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 06:23 AM

For the cost and amount I'd go new too.

 

I'm using both Starsan and Iodophor.  Changing it up keeps the boogie men at bay


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#4 HVB

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Posted 16 January 2019 - 06:24 AM

I'd just use new water but it's probably fine.

 

I would do the same.  I know Starsan is said to be good if at a certain pH, I wonder if Iodophor is the same way.


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#5 denny

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 09:50 AM

I would do the same.  I know Starsan is said to be good if at a certain pH, I wonder if Iodophor is the same way.

 

No, because it's action isnt pH dependent.  Read this...I have a more extensive pdf if anyone wants it...

 

Broad-spectrum Germicides.

The term “Broad Spectrum” when applied to a sanitizer means that it will attack a wide variety of different types of microorganisms, including gram-positive bacteria (Listeria and Staphylococcus), gram negative bacteria (E. coli and Salmonella), viruses, fungi (both yeasts and molds), as well as many parasites. Broad-spectrum germicides act on microbial membranes, cellular enzymes, DNA, and protein. Iodine-based sanitizers have been used as antimicrobial agents since the 1800s and have a broad spectrum of activity They are a powerful sanitizer in strong acidic aqueous solutions. They are generally used at 12.5 to 25 ppm available iodine, and can cause staining on some surfaces, especially plastics.

 

Acid-anionic sanitizers are surface-active sanitizers, but negatively charged. Formulations include inorganic and organic acids plus a surfactant. Carboxylic acids (fatty acids) are some times incorporated as well. They are unaffected by hard water or organic soils. The dual function of acid is that it can be used for rinsing and sanitizing in one step. These sanitizers must be used at low pH. Activity above pH 3.5–4.0 is minimal. Acidity, detergency, stability, and noncorrosiveness makes them highly effective. Acid-anionic sanitizers are broad spectrum against bacteria and viruses, but not very effective against yeasts and molds.

 

Iodophors are considered broad spectrum anti microbial vs. Star San being a being anti bacterial.  The actual label for Star San lists what it is registered to kill: E Coli and Staph A – the minimum baseline for allowing a claim of being a sanitizer with the EPA.  Iodophor has proven effectiveness against not only gram positive and negative bacteria, but yeast, mold, fungi and viruses and is also a sporicidal agent.


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#6 Zsasz

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 09:53 AM

sounds like I should get some iodophor the next time I order supplies.


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#7 ER Pemberton

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 10:22 AM

No, because it's action isnt pH dependent.  Read this...I have a more extensive pdf if anyone wants it...

 

Broad-spectrum Germicides.

The term “Broad Spectrum” when applied to a sanitizer means that it will attack a wide variety of different types of microorganisms, including gram-positive bacteria (Listeria and Staphylococcus), gram negative bacteria (E. coli and Salmonella), viruses, fungi (both yeasts and molds), as well as many parasites. Broad-spectrum germicides act on microbial membranes, cellular enzymes, DNA, and protein. Iodine-based sanitizers have been used as antimicrobial agents since the 1800s and have a broad spectrum of activity They are a powerful sanitizer in strong acidic aqueous solutions. They are generally used at 12.5 to 25 ppm available iodine, and can cause staining on some surfaces, especially plastics.

 

Acid-anionic sanitizers are surface-active sanitizers, but negatively charged. Formulations include inorganic and organic acids plus a surfactant. Carboxylic acids (fatty acids) are some times incorporated as well. They are unaffected by hard water or organic soils. The dual function of acid is that it can be used for rinsing and sanitizing in one step. These sanitizers must be used at low pH. Activity above pH 3.5–4.0 is minimal. Acidity, detergency, stability, and noncorrosiveness makes them highly effective. Acid-anionic sanitizers are broad spectrum against bacteria and viruses, but not very effective against yeasts and molds.

 

Iodophors are considered broad spectrum anti microbial vs. Star San being a being anti bacterial.  The actual label for Star San lists what it is registered to kill: E Coli and Staph A – the minimum baseline for allowing a claim of being a sanitizer with the EPA.  Iodophor has proven effectiveness against not only gram positive and negative bacteria, but yeast, mold, fungi and viruses and is also a sporicidal agent.

Thanks for that Denny.  That last part was exactly how it was described to me... especially the "yeast, mold and fungi" part.  Again, my experience with Starsan seemed very good to me.  But if Iodophor has a wider range of sanitizing power that seems like a winner to me.  Some pros and cons:  Starsan seems odorless and flavorless and it seems to "keep" so you can fill a spray bottle, etc. and use it when you need to.  But the foaming can be a PITA and we now see that its sanitizing power has limitations.  Iodophor appears to sanitize a wider range of cooties and there is no foaming,  I think it may be cheaper as well.  But it's already staining some buckets of mine and although the packaging says it's odorless and tasteless, we all know that's not true.  You can smell it in its diluted form and some brewers are saying that they can even pick up the flavor/smell of iodophor in their beers... which I don't think will be a problem for me.  



#8 denny

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 11:38 AM

sounds like I should get some iodophor the next time I order supplies.

 

I use it 90% of the time these days


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#9 Zsasz

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Posted 18 January 2019 - 12:00 PM

I use it 90% of the time these days

 

I have a big jug of starsan so I probably wouldn't do that but I might consider doing an occasional sanitizing round with the iodophor just to keep bugs at bay.


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