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Pitching yeast...


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#1 ER Pemberton

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 06:27 PM

I'm not sure if this is just because I've been brewing so much and have super-active yeast or what but part of the low-O2 process is to pitch yeast before you oxygenate.  Right after my transfer starts I shake my flask and pour the yeast into the wort in the fermenter.  I also run some of the flowing wort into the flask, swirl it and add that to make sure I have as much yeast as possible in there.  I can go back into the bunker and check on the the beer in 30-60 minutes and the side of the keg that has been run into a small bucket of sanitizer has already started to bubble.  That's about as quick as I've seen active fermentation begin.  



#2 Bklmt2000

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 07:26 PM

I'm not sure if this is just because I've been brewing so much and have super-active yeast or what but part of the low-O2 process is to pitch yeast before you oxygenate.  Right after my transfer starts I shake my flask and pour the yeast into the wort in the fermenter.  I also run some of the flowing wort into the flask, swirl it and add that to make sure I have as much yeast as possible in there.  I can go back into the bunker and check on the the beer in 30-60 minutes and the side of the keg that has been run into a small bucket of sanitizer has already started to bubble.  That's about as quick as I've seen active fermentation begin.  

 

I know next to nothing about low-O2 brewing, but what you're describing sounds like the yeast is extremely fresh and healthy, not to mention hungry.

 

YDIR.


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#3 drez77

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 07:36 PM

I thought some lag time was good and the yeast were doing things during that period. Man, I should really read the Yeast book but that sounds like work. :)
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#4 ER Pemberton

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Posted 06 January 2019 - 07:39 PM

I know next to nothing about low-O2 brewing, but what you're describing sounds like the yeast is extremely fresh and healthy, not to mention hungry.

 

YDIR.

Yeah, that has to be part of it.  The yeast-pitching part of the low-O2 process allows for some splashing of the wort and some direct oxygenation with pure O2 because the yeast need it at that point and yeast is [supposedly] the best oxygen scavenger that brewers have.  The whole time you're trying to be careful of "oxygen uptake" and "surface intrusion", etc. but at the point of pitching some oxygen is okay as long as the yeast is already present.  So instead of transferring all teh wort and then pitching, you start the transfer and then pitch right away.  That plus the super-fresh yeast seems to make for some quick starts.  


I thought some lag time was good and the yeast were doing things during that period. Man, I should really read the Yeast book but that sounds like work. :)

I seem to remember something about overpitching and the yeast skipping a phase that produces flavors that beer drinkers find pleasing but you still want quick starts, right?  I hear you on the book... I have only read parts of it.  Same for WATER.  <_<




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