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Who has experimented with shorter mash times?


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#1 ER Pemberton

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Posted 14 December 2018 - 01:22 PM

I'm talking single infusion mashing for standard-gravity beers (5% or so).  I have been mashing for 60 minutes without much change for a long time.  I've done a few step mashes here and there but usually just a single infusion.  I read something the other day on the low-O2 board that mentioned that mashing for 60 minutes with today's heavily-modified malts, a brewer can destroy some of the head-forming (and head-stabilizing) compounds in a longer-than-necessary mash.  I'll be honest:  I mash for 60 minutes so I know the mash is complete and so I don't have to think much about it.  I thought Drez mentioned trying 30 or 45-minute mashes and seeing no real difference or downside.  But was there an upside... other than saving 15-30 minutes?  :D



#2 djinkc

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Posted 14 December 2018 - 01:35 PM

I've done multiple 30 minute mashes this year and don't really see any difference.  That's fly sparging though and it usually takes an hour to collect 13.5 gallons - I suppose the enzymes are still working.  My one vessel starters mash for 12 minutes, drain for a minute and start heating.  But I don't drink those............


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#3 LeftyMPfrmDE

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Posted 14 December 2018 - 01:54 PM

I've mashed with a cooler and a converted sankey keg; and useally get poor efficiency if I mash less then 60 minutes; then again, that's batch sparging and with a slow flow rate; about an hour each to collect strike and sparge volumes. Did a 45 minute mash once, with a slow run off, and got about 60% efficiency; ball park is usually anywhere between 72-78%.   


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#4 ER Pemberton

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Posted 14 December 2018 - 02:06 PM

I've mashed with a cooler and a converted sankey keg; and useally get poor efficiency if I mash less then 60 minutes; then again, that's batch sparging and with a slow flow rate; about an hour each to collect strike and sparge volumes. Did a 45 minute mash once, with a slow run off, and got about 60% efficiency; ball park is usually anywhere between 72-78%.   

Mmm, I don't like the sound of that.  I thought some others had done one with no real ill-effects.  I'm not changing anything at the moment but it always seems like there are shifting ideas out there.  



#5 Poptop

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Posted 14 December 2018 - 02:10 PM

I seem to get terrible efficiency with 60 minutes.  Then again I'm in head scratching mode due to the change to BIAB.  Still not sold on it versus my mash tun.  The last two 60 minute mashes I did I fell short of target by 5 points each.  Tonight I'm mashing in for an early morning brew session.  I'll see that goes.


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#6 HVB

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Posted 14 December 2018 - 02:15 PM

I do 30 at sac temp and 15 at 165. Yes, I still mash out because I can.
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#7 jayb151

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Posted 14 December 2018 - 04:03 PM

I feel there is very little difference between a 30 or 60 min mash on my system. I get similar efficiencies, and the final product is pretty reliable. 

 

The few times I've done extended mashes, I've seen better efficiency, and a thinner finished product. It's not necessarily dryer though. 


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#8 Bklmt2000

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Posted 15 December 2018 - 11:00 AM

Mainly out of habit and how I structure brewdays, my mashes always sit for 60 minutes, and usually more (upwards of 75-90 minutes).

 

I don't start heating sparge water until 40 minutes into the mash, and by the time it's up to temp to begin the sparge, the mash has rested a good 60 min or more.

 

The few times I've mashed for less than an hour b/w mash-in and sparging, I wasn't happy with the resulting beers, so I stick with what works in my brewery.


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#9 denny

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Posted 15 December 2018 - 11:57 AM

3 gal. BIAB with 20 min. mash, 20 min. boil.  75% efficiency


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#10 Genesee Ted

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Posted 18 December 2018 - 03:21 PM

Iodine tests are your friend. I rarely see a positive test past 20 mins. That being said, I usually rest for 20 mins and then recirc for another 20 before runoff and then sparge.

#11 denny

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Posted 19 December 2018 - 11:03 AM

Iodine tests are your friend. I rarely see a positive test past 20 mins. That being said, I usually rest for 20 mins and then recirc for another 20 before runoff and then sparge.

 

IMO, iodine tests are worthless.


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#12 jayb151

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 11:17 AM

IMO, iodine tests are worthless.

 

Just asking, but you think they're never accurate? or you think after 20 min it's not worth testing because it's all converted?


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#13 denny

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Posted 20 December 2018 - 11:40 AM

Just asking, but you think they're never accurate? or you think after 20 min it's not worth testing because it's all converted?

 

I think it's so easy to get a false reading that you learn nothing useful from them.


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#14 gnef

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Posted 04 January 2019 - 07:28 PM

I started experimenting with shorter mashes and boils last year. I haven't noticed any ill effects. I will say that my palate isn't nearly as sensitive as others though.

 

The time savings are great though, along with electric brewing. I just brewed with a friend, and we did about 12 gallons of a brown ale, we did a 45 minute mash and a 30 minute boil, and from setup to done with cleaning was less than 3.5 hours.

 

When I brew 5 gallon batches for myself, I've done it in 2.5 hours straight.

 

When I brew on a week night, I break up the brew day. When we get home from work, I spend about 40 minutes getting the mash started, then go up for dinner and the children's bedtime routine, and then it only takes me about 1.5 hours to finish the 5 gallon batch. This would be considered an extended mash and a short boil.


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