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My First Pro-Am.


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#1 LeftyMPfrmDE

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Posted 29 August 2018 - 10:38 AM

New, Local brewery decided to have a Pro-Am competition, submit a recipe, and 5 recipes chosen; and if it's chosen, get to brew it on the 1BBL system, to be released on "new beer Monday". the beer that gets kicked the fastest, is scaled up to there 15 BBL system, and all profits get donated to the choice of the homebrewer. I was one of the five. Pretty excited about this- they use a Spike Electric system, and it will give me a preview on electric brewing, as I've been wanting to pull the trigger on a turn key Spike electric system. 

 

 

Wish me luck!


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#2 drez77

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Posted 29 August 2018 - 10:56 AM

Good luck, what is the recipe?

 

Electric brewing is great and I have been doing it for at least 10 years.  I started back before there were turnkey systems and plans everywhere :)  Would never go back to propane!


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#3 LeftyMPfrmDE

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Posted 31 August 2018 - 06:38 AM

Its recipe I've been really enjoying lately; i call it "NE bitter", 33.3% 2 row, 33.3% marris otter, and 33.3% wheat. Only a flameout addition of mosaic and el dardo, then the same hop addition about day 4 into fermentation, the "bio-transformation" addition, from what I've read.

Fermented with chico yeast, and clocks in under 4%.
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#4 drez77

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Posted 31 August 2018 - 06:41 AM

That sounds good and I would drink it!  I do my bio-tranasform additional t 2 days and another at kegging but I am not sure it makes a huge difference.


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#5 LeftyMPfrmDE

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Posted 31 August 2018 - 06:48 AM

Thought of adding a keg addition with this recipe, but its already a hop bomb; whenever I add hops in the keg, I get harsh, grassy notes. My own taste.
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#6 drez77

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Posted 31 August 2018 - 07:01 AM

Thought of adding a keg addition with this recipe, but its already a hop bomb; whenever I add hops in the keg, I get harsh, grassy notes. My own taste.

I also have gotten that same reaction before.  I think it is more prevalent with certain hops.. at least for me.


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#7 Hines

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Posted 31 August 2018 - 09:17 AM

:wub: marris otter


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#8 Genesee Ted

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Posted 04 September 2018 - 10:13 AM

Thought of adding a keg addition with this recipe, but its already a hop bomb; whenever I add hops in the keg, I get harsh, grassy notes. My own taste.

Keg additions are a little more tricky too on a commercial scale. It’s bad enough that it’s hard to transfer off the hops and into the bright tank to settle and carb before you keg. You still get some in there from time to time. Most consumers aren’t big on that. The other thing if you want to keep as much of that out of the Sanke kegs as possible because they are harder to clean. Not that you can’t take the spear out and do it manually, but doing that with 30 or more kegs for a 15 bbl batch ain’t happening. Easy to do with a couple of cornies, not so much with 30 sankes. The other variable becomes that the beer will take a while to be sold, so your hop exposure time is really variable, leading to overall inconsistencies for the final consumer.


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