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Base for Peach Ale


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#1 armagh

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 08:27 AM

It's getting close to that time of year for the Georgia peach harvest and unlike last year, this year is supposed to be a good one.  In the past I've made a basic American wheat (4lbs base malt/4lbs wheat malt), added peaches in 2ndry.  Thinking about changing things up and using cream ale for a base beer.  Any thoughts?


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#2 drez77

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 08:32 AM

Not sure this is the direction you would want to go but I am planning on a peach Berliner Weisse.  I think the peach will play well in that beer.


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#3 ER Pemberton

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 08:38 AM

Seems like it should be as plain as possible so you just have a stage for the fruit.  I was going to suggest what you already did... Brewer's 2-row and wheat in whatever percentages.  Hops early in the boil and nothing late to get in the way of the peaches.

 

One question I have is how will you handle the secondary fermentation that will kick up in secondary when the fruit is added?  I ask because I tried making beers like this in the past and that secondary fermentation (which seems to be very slow and long) ended up drying out the beer and throwing the balance off.  People have suggested adding lactose, killing the yeast with [something... I forget] and a number of other things.  What's your process there?



#4 armagh

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 09:56 AM

They yeast can be killed off with potassium sorbate, if you choose to go that route, I never have.  Typically I leave the base in secondary for four weeks then siphon carefully on to the defrosted fruit (which, at that point, would have been blanched, stoned and frozen/thawed), leaving behind as much trub as possible.  There is occasionally some additional fermentation but not enough to overcome the fruit sugars.  My usual is 12-15 pounds fruit per five gallon batch, which perhaps overwhelms the yeast(?). When max fruit flavor is achieved, keg and carb or bottle.  If the left over fruit looks fat with liquid, press and add to the batch before kegging or bottling.

 

Having made more batches of melomel than I can accurately remember, I adopted the same procedures with beer.


Edited by armagh, 20 June 2018 - 09:57 AM.

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#5 Poptop

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 10:04 AM

Just throwing an idea but my tastes would appreciate something that has a creamy finish like a Push Up Pop but with Peach. Not sure how to achieve that though. Perhaps some lactose sugar?
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#6 ER Pemberton

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 10:11 AM

They yeast can be killed off with potassium sorbate, if you choose to go that route, I never have.  Typically I leave the base in secondary for four weeks then siphon carefully on to the defrosted fruit (which, at that point, would have been blanched, stoned and frozen/thawed), leaving behind as much trub as possible.  There is occasionally some additional fermentation but not enough to overcome the fruit sugars.  My usual is 12-15 pounds fruit per five gallon batch, which perhaps overwhelms the yeast(?). When max fruit flavor is achieved, keg and carb or bottle.  If the left over fruit looks fat with liquid, press and add to the batch before kegging or bottling.

 

Having made more batches of melomel than I can accurately remember, I adopted the same procedures with beer.

That might be the best process I have seen... allow the beer to fully ferment and allow most of the yeast & trub to settle and then transfer the beer and leave as much behind as possible so that you kick up less of a secondary fermentation.  My guess is that you'll still get yeast in the next vessel and there might be SOME fermentation going on (and sending the beer to bottles at that point could be dangerous...) but not nearly as bad as having more yeast in there.  The potassium sorbate may not be necessary but it's good to know it can be used to control things.  



#7 armagh

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 12:04 PM

Just throwing an idea but my tastes would appreciate something that has a creamy finish like a Push Up Pop but with Peach. Not sure how to achieve that though. Perhaps some lactose sugar?

Not knowing what a push pop was, I foolishly googled.  First thing up was the urban dictionary.  I did not need to know about that.

 

  My guess is that you'll still get yeast in the next vessel and there might be SOME fermentation going on (and sending the beer to bottles at that point could be dangerous...) but not nearly as bad as having more yeast in there.  The potassium sorbate may not be necessary but it's good to know it can be used to control things.  

Cold crashing the batch after fruit removal should eliminate any residual yeast issues.  It does with mead, and the wine yeasts used for mead can go 12-14% without breaking a sweat.


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#8 StankDelicious

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 02:51 PM

Not knowing what a push pop was, I foolishly googled.  First thing up was the urban dictionary.  I did not need to know about that.

 

 

 

:spray:


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#9 ER Pemberton

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Posted 20 June 2018 - 03:22 PM

First time in history we're going to have to close a thread in the beer forum?  :lol:



#10 Poptop

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 04:42 AM

Not knowing what a push pop was, I foolishly googled.  First thing up was the urban dictionary.  I did not need to know about that.


I can see how the internets would make it so confusing

https://www.drumstic...-up-orange.aspx
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#11 drez77

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 04:45 AM

I can see how the internets would make it so confusing

https://www.drumstic...-up-orange.aspx

I knew exactly what you were thinking of.  I think lactose, maybe 1/2# in the boil, would be a good way to go to keep that sweetness.


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#12 Poptop

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 05:43 AM

I knew exactly what you were thinking of.  I think lactose, maybe 1/2# in the boil, would be a good way to go to keep that sweetness.


I don't do much with wheat or fruit but the whole idea sounds very refreshing. And a little lactose would definitely add a smoothness imho.

I don't want to derail the thread. As mentioned it was just a brain freeze I had :) Carry on.
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#13 ER Pemberton

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 05:46 AM

What was the way to give the beer a little body and 'texture'... maltodextrin?  It's not sweet but it looks like powdered sugar and is supposed to help especially in low-ABV beers that may be thin.  That could help with the "push pop" creaminess.  



#14 drez77

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 06:05 AM

What was the way to give the beer a little body and 'texture'... maltodextrin?  It's not sweet but it looks like powdered sugar and is supposed to help especially in low-ABV beers that may be thin.  That could help with the "push pop" creaminess.  

I would think if you adjust the Chloride in the water you could get there as well.


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#15 Seven

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Posted 21 June 2018 - 07:10 AM

I made a peaches and cream wheat last month. It's now kegged and carbed and will be served at a homebrew fest this weekend. I used 2 row, wheat and some quick oats as the base, small charge of Citra and fermented with US56 or whatever it's called now. Added dried apricots that I rehydrated, pureed and pasteurized after fermentation slowed. Kegged with lactose and peach extract. It's pretty good...not really my style but a decent beer. I'm calling it "Peaches Lack Toes".
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