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Hops ... who knew all they could do


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#1 drez77

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 10:09 AM

I found this fascinating, maybe I am just out of the loop.

 

"In 2017, Jason Perkins of Allagash Brewing presented at the Craft Brewers Conference on a study they conducted with Oregon State University to test the impact of dry hopping on beer attenuation and found that by adding dry hops to a fully attenuated beer (their sample was Coors Banquet), they could cause significant additional attenuation in the beer. Over 40 days, those dry hops were able to drop the finished Coors Banquet from about 1.014 SG to 1.007, taking the beer from 4.9 percent ABV to 6.2 percent by creating enzymatic activity that broke down nonfermentable dextrins in the beer."

 

Some other interesting information here.  Makes you really think about how hopping has changed so much in the last few years.

 


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#2 pickle_rick

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 10:15 AM

I have never heard of this.  before I read it I'm wondering what the enzymes turn those dextrins into and if it's something desirable or not.


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#3 denny

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 10:16 AM

I found this fascinating, maybe I am just out of the loop.

 

"In 2017, Jason Perkins of Allagash Brewing presented at the Craft Brewers Conference on a study they conducted with Oregon State University to test the impact of dry hopping on beer attenuation and found that by adding dry hops to a fully attenuated beer (their sample was Coors Banquet), they could cause significant additional attenuation in the beer. Over 40 days, those dry hops were able to drop the finished Coors Banquet from about 1.014 SG to 1.007, taking the beer from 4.9 percent ABV to 6.2 percent by creating enzymatic activity that broke down nonfermentable dextrins in the beer."

 

Some other interesting information here.  Makes you really think about how hopping has changed so much in the last few years.

 

Dude, we covered this on the podcast years ago....it mainly comes from hops with seeds.  https://www.experime...12-going-staleĀ Also, http://onlinelibrary...6070.x/abstract


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#4 pickle_rick

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 10:17 AM

reading now - this is great.  so if you want "juicy" beer should you add more lactic or citric acid to knock the pH down prior to dry hopping?


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#5 drez77

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Posted 19 June 2018 - 10:21 AM

Dude, we covered this on the podcast years ago....it mainly comes from hops with seeds.  https://www.experime...12-going-staleĀ Also, http://onlinelibrary...6070.x/abstract

I will go back and check that out.  I do not listen to many podcasts anymore these days so I obviously missed it.  Thanks for the links.


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