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Brut IPA


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#1 drez77

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 04:39 AM

This was touched on in the Experimental Brewing thread but I thought it could use its own thread.  I stumbled across this new take on IPA over the weekend when I saw this on Instagram

 

27771138237_ff3df28b3a_c.jpg

 

Seems interesting, dry as hell IPA that is hoped similar to a NEIPA.  So low bitterness but lots of flavor and aroma and it seems they are using enzymes to get it to near 1.000 FG. 

 

Denny had this link http://www.thebeersc...-how-to-make-it in his thead and I think it is a good one and the comments have lots of good discussion.

 

Here is another article from Chris Colby that talks about the parts of the beer and some recipe design http://beerandwinejo...com/brut-ipa-i/

 

I hope to get some time to try and get one of these brewed for the peak of summer.  I can see it being a nice summer drinker.


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#2 ER Pemberton

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 05:10 AM

I'd try that.  Also, the graphic on the can looks like the Simpsons.  :D

 

Just for the sake of conversation, how does one "use" amylase enzymes?  Is it a liquid, powder, etc., how much would one use and is it possible to "overuse" it?  For awhile there it seemed like there were conversations about how mash temps don't really make your beer drier or maltier (a beer mashed at 145 and one mashed at 160 come out very similarly... remember that conversation?) so how else would one get the FG so low other than the enzymes or maybe some percentage of sugar.  Interesting.  



#3 Bklmt2000

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 05:31 AM

I'd try that.  Also, the graphic on the can looks like the Simpsons.  :D

 

Just for the sake of conversation, how does one "use" amylase enzymes?  Is it a liquid, powder, etc., how much would one use and is it possible to "overuse" it?  For awhile there it seemed like there were conversations about how mash temps don't really make your beer drier or maltier (a beer mashed at 145 and one mashed at 160 come out very similarly... remember that conversation?) so how else would one get the FG so low other than the enzymes or maybe some percentage of sugar.  Interesting.  

 

It's Zap Branigan from Futurama.


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#4 Poptop

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 05:37 AM

Very interesting articles, thank you for sharing. I could definitely try this. 3711 comes to mind with something like this
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#5 drez77

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 06:20 AM

Very interesting articles, thank you for sharing. I could definitely try this. 3711 comes to mind with something like this

I think in one of the articles saison yeast was mentioned.  I can see that working well because that can get DRY with out the use of enzymes on its own.


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#6 drez77

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 06:25 AM

I'd try that.  Also, the graphic on the can looks like the Simpsons.  :D

 

Just for the sake of conversation, how does one "use" amylase enzymes?  Is it a liquid, powder, etc., how much would one use and is it possible to "overuse" it?  For awhile there it seemed like there were conversations about how mash temps don't really make your beer drier or maltier (a beer mashed at 145 and one mashed at 160 come out very similarly... remember that conversation?) so how else would one get the FG so low other than the enzymes or maybe some percentage of sugar.  Interesting.  

I believe the enzyme is liquid that is used in the boil although some of the commercial enzymes may be used in teh fermentation but that is still unclear to me.  It seems that Kim Sturdavant is using something in the fermetnor.  I have to do some research and pick up some enzymes, I know White Labs has one that some claimed to work for this beer.

 

As for mash temp, I have a Pale Lager that was mashed accidentally at 160 and there is no way I can tell.  I am not sure mash temp plays a role anymore but I would imagine that maybe a step mash may help some.


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#7 armagh

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 07:27 AM

White Labs UltraFerm would provide the enzymes and it is a liquid.  Usually used by distillers, IIRC.

 

I'd think WY3787 would do nicely for a yeast.


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#8 drez77

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 07:36 AM

White Labs UltraFerm would provide the enzymes and it is a liquid.  Usually used by distillers, IIRC.

 

I'd think WY3787 would do nicely for a yeast.

I wonder if Beano will work as well.


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#9 denny

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 08:23 AM

I'd try that.  Also, the graphic on the can looks like the Simpsons.  :D

 

Just for the sake of conversation, how does one "use" amylase enzymes?  Is it a liquid, powder, etc., how much would one use and is it possible to "overuse" it?  For awhile there it seemed like there were conversations about how mash temps don't really make your beer drier or maltier (a beer mashed at 145 and one mashed at 160 come out very similarly... remember that conversation?) so how else would one get the FG so low other than the enzymes or maybe some percentage of sugar.  Interesting.  

 

You can use it in the mash or post fermentation.  If you use it in the mash, boiling wlil denature it.  This is what most people are using....https://www.whitelabs.com/ultraferm .


I think in one of the articles saison yeast was mentioned.  I can see that working well because that can get DRY with out the use of enzymes on its own.

 

Especially 3711 since it's a diastaticus strain.


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#10 denny

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Posted 07 June 2018 - 08:59 AM

I think in one of the articles saison yeast was mentioned.  I can see that working well because that can get DRY with out the use of enzymes on its own.

 

Especially 3711 since it's a diastaticus strain.


I wonder if Beano will work as well.

 

IIRC from the Beano craze years ago, it's kinda the same but not quite.


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#11 EnkAMania

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Posted 08 June 2018 - 11:27 AM

I might give this a shot with Conan yeast, as I have a bunch of it laying around


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#12 denny

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Posted 08 June 2018 - 11:57 AM

I might give this a shot with Conan yeast, as I have a bunch of it laying around

 

While you can of course make anything you like, if you want to keep it in the Brut IPA range you might want to use a different yeast.


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#13 drez77

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Posted 08 June 2018 - 12:22 PM

While you can of course make anything you like, if you want to keep it in the Brut IPA range you might want to use a different yeast.

I am curious about your comment.  I have read of a few places using that yeast for these beers.  Are you suggesting that conan is going to stall?


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#14 denny

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Posted 08 June 2018 - 01:00 PM

I am curious about your comment.  I have read of a few places using that yeast for these beers.  Are you suggesting that conan is going to stall?

 

No, just that I think the mouthfeel wouldn't be right.  But it sounds like you've go more info than I do.


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#15 djinkc

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Posted 09 June 2018 - 08:24 AM

Interesting.  Glucoamylase is what converts starch to sugars when making rice wine.  Aspergillus along with some kind of yeast is in the rice balls used.  I still have several bottles from the last batch I made.  I'm tempted to make a gallon batch of beer with it.


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