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Question about brew in a bag brewing


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#1 Nick Bates

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 07:37 AM

Has anyone done this method of brewing? I am in the process of getting into all grain brewing, and i figured this might get my feet wet as far as learning some of the steps. Ive read the efficiency is not as high. Anyone have any advantages or disadvantes? Can doing this method take the LME and DME out of the picture?thanks
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#2 zymot

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 08:05 AM

I have been to The World's Fair 3 times. I have been on this board since day one. Been cruising several other home brew boards, reading magazines and reading home brew web sites for 6 years.In all that time, I have never come across "bag brewing." Got a link or description?There used to be "Beer in a Bag", some kit that used extract, sort of like a squishy Mr. Beer.
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#3 siouxbrewer

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 08:27 AM

I've read about this in a BYO a while back spotlighting Australian brewers. Basically, it's a no-sparge, single-vessel method in which the mash is conducted in a big nylon bag inside the kettle. Instead of sparging, all of the strike water is added to the infusion, after mashing, the grain bag is removed and the wort is boiled in the same vessel. I do this for my mini all grain batches on the stove top. The concept is that grain is cheap and what you lose in efficiency is made up for in time and savings on additional equipment. I've recommended this to many who are interested in starting all grain and who don't have the funds for separate brew vessels. Hope this helps. SB
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#4 54BelAir

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 08:41 AM

Here's a link https://www.thebrewi...php?f=2&t=4650I have have thought about trying this myself. Seems like a good way to work into all grain.
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#5 MakeMeHoppy

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 08:44 AM

Brew In Bag VideoHere is a link that I recently watched. My only concern about this method is that I don't see any way to get the grain dust out of the wort. When you do other all grain methods you use the grain bed to filter this.I'd say give it a try, the cost is a mesh sparging bag.
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#6 zymot

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 08:48 AM

I've read about this in a BYO a while back spotlighting Australian brewers. Basically, it's a no-sparge, single-vessel method in which the mash is conducted in a big nylon bag inside the kettle. Instead of sparging, all of the strike water is added to the infusion, after mashing, the grain bag is removed and the wort is boiled in the same vessel. I do this for my mini all grain batches on the stove top. The concept is that grain is cheap and what you lose in efficiency is made up for in time and savings on additional equipment. I've recommended this to many who are interested in starting all grain and who don't have the funds for separate brew vessels. Hope this helps. SB

Sounds like a great idea. (Except to the brewers where efficiency is everything and spending an extra 2% or 5% more is a sin)Mashtuns cost money, a suitable bag is ~$2.00 at the hardware store. Sounds like a great way to get into all grain brewing.If I knew about this at the time, I would have done this in my transition to all grain.Hey Nick, Go for it!
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#7 MakeMeHoppy

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 09:29 AM

I was just thinking, someone in my club does partial mash 10 gallon batches. He does a large mash in a brew pot and then pours it into a bottling bucket with a sparging bag. He can vorlouf to clear the wort and then just drain into the brew kettle. You can do this with your normal brew kettle. Just mash in the kettle transfer to the bottling bucket and clean the kettle before the transfer back.A bottling bucket should easily hold enough grain for a typical 5 gallon batch.
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#8 Nick Bates

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 10:35 AM

Brew In Bag VideoHere is a link that I recently watched. My only concern about this method is that I don't see any way to get the grain dust out of the wort. When you do other all grain methods you use the grain bed to filter this.I'd say give it a try, the cost is a mesh sparging bag.

this was the video I watched that sparked the idea of doing it, it seemed like a great idea. As of right now ive been doin the brewers best kits were you get the grains and extract, but id like to venture away from it. I have bought two igloo coolers to convert for all grain brewing have not converted them yet, so i figured ill try this first, i think I will take your advise makemehoppy and do the transfer after the mash and then pour back into brew kettle, should I worry about off flavors with the transfering of the wort from vessel to vessel???
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#9 Howie

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Posted 24 January 2010 - 10:21 PM

I do this for my mini all grain batches on the stove top.

I've been considering doing this very thing for quick, weeknight brews inside when I don't have time to brew on the full AG setup.I'd love to hear more about your experiences and results.
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#10 MakeMeHoppy

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 07:03 AM

this was the video I watched that sparked the idea of doing it, it seemed like a great idea. As of right now ive been doin the brewers best kits were you get the grains and extract, but id like to venture away from it. I have bought two igloo coolers to convert for all grain brewing have not converted them yet, so i figured ill try this first, i think I will take your advise makemehoppy and do the transfer after the mash and then pour back into brew kettle, should I worry about off flavors with the transfering of the wort from vessel to vessel???

I would not be worried about off flavors. I assume you are hinting at hot side aeration. Give it a try and see how you like the final beer and then go from there.
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#11 Howie

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 07:55 AM

I would not be worried about off flavors. I assume you are hinting at hot side aeration. Give it a try and see how you like the final beer and then go from there.

Yeah, I think Basic Brewing Radio did a very unscientific test where they were very careless in handling the hot wort (splashing, etc) and found absolutely no trace of oxidation in the finished beer.
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#12 harryfrog

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 09:28 AM

My last batch I did a "no-sparge" method where all the water goes into the mash tun. I actually got higher efficiency than I was estimating (I planned on 50%, think I came in around 60%).It's kind of a hybrid between the two ideas, but you can vorlauf with the "no-sparge" method and clear the runnings. It did definately speed up my brew day as I didn't have to wait for the 40 minutes for a sparge. I just ran off the wort as quick as possible.
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#13 zymot

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 09:38 AM

I would not be worried about off flavors. I assume you are hinting at hot side aeration. Give it a try and see how you like the final beer and then go from there.

Yeah, I think Basic Brewing Radio did a very unscientific test where they were very careless in handling the hot wort (splashing, etc) and found absolutely no trace of oxidation in the finished beer.

Every time I see how big breweries handle their hot wort, I come to the conclusion that HSA makes for an excessive distraction to the homebrewer.They splash and pour and pump hot wort with abandon. If I ever take a tour of a brewery, I am going to ask somebody about this.zymot
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#14 xd_haze

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 10:09 AM

Brew In Bag VideoHere is a link that I recently watched. My only concern about this method is that I don't see any way to get the grain dust out of the wort. When you do other all grain methods you use the grain bed to filter this.I'd say give it a try, the cost is a mesh sparging bag.

I'd be worried about the dust as well. mike
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#15 siouxbrewer

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 02:23 PM

I've been considering doing this very thing for quick, weeknight brews inside when I don't have time to brew on the full AG setup.I'd love to hear more about your experiences and results.

I started doing this when the weather dropped below zero a few weeks back. I figured it was an easy way to fill my 2.5 gal corny, step up some yeast and have some fun in the kitchen. I use two large stock pots, I'm guessing 4 gal, and heat up strike water in one and sparge water in the other. I mash in the grain bag, when an hour is up, I pull out the bag and let it drain over a large spoon I have laid across the top of the kettle. I then place the bag in the pot filled with sparge water and leave it set for 15-20 to let the sugars re-disperse, then I drain over the spoon like before, and combine into one kettle. Boil, add hops, chill, and transfer to my 4 gal mini fermenter. I've had great, drinkable results every time I've done this and it takes about three hours start to finish. No hoses, pumps, starters, etc to deal with makes cleanup a snap. Hope this helps. SB
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#16 Howie

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 04:47 PM

I started doing this when the weather dropped below zero a few weeks back. I figured it was an easy way to fill my 2.5 gal corny, step up some yeast and have some fun in the kitchen. I use two large stock pots, I'm guessing 4 gal, and heat up strike water in one and sparge water in the other. I mash in the grain bag, when an hour is up, I pull out the bag and let it drain over a large spoon I have laid across the top of the kettle. I then place the bag in the pot filled with sparge water and leave it set for 15-20 to let the sugars re-disperse, then I drain over the spoon like before, and combine into one kettle. Boil, add hops, chill, and transfer to my 4 gal mini fermenter. I've had great, drinkable results every time I've done this and it takes about three hours start to finish. No hoses, pumps, starters, etc to deal with makes cleanup a snap. Hope this helps. SB

That two pot sparge, half batch setup is EXACTLY what I was planning to do. Glad to hear you are having good results. Might try it out this week.
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#17 djinkc

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Posted 25 January 2010 - 05:18 PM

I've done this for a quick 20 min mash for an AG starter. It worked great. Probably won't do it again once I start using the pressure cooker I bought of CL.
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